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Author Topic: Mirage IIIK  (Read 5072 times)

Offline uk 75

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #45 on: January 27, 2018, 11:06:15 am »
The saga of the attempts by the RAF to replace its ground attack Hunters and the Royal Navy's to replace the Sea Vixen in the early 1960s has been only patchily covered.
So many projects and companies tried to get in on the act.
I find these the most fascinating of the what-ifs.
The Mirage IIIK was one of the more sensible contenders.

Offline Pioneer

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2018, 11:33:35 am »
My goodness hesham, some of those P. 39 designs have a ridiculous amount of lift engines incorporated into them,  whichvI would think emphasised V/TOL as its principle role, as opposed to an actual strike mission  :o

Thanks for sharing the diagram!

Regards
Pioneer
And remember…remember the glory is not the exhortation of war, but the exhortation of man.
Mans nobility, made transcendent in the fiery crucible of war.
Faithfulness and fortitude.
Gentleness and compassion.
I am honored to be your brother.”

— Lt Col Ralph Honner DSO M

Offline hesham

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2018, 02:14:04 pm »
Thank you my dear Pioneer.

Offline Harrier

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2018, 03:31:49 pm »
The saga of the attempts by the RAF to replace its ground attack Hunters and the Royal Navy's to replace the Sea Vixen in the early 1960s has been only patchily covered.
So many projects and companies tried to get in on the act.
I find these the most fascinating of the what-ifs.
The Mirage IIIK was one of the more sensible contenders.

The answer was the P1154, which has been pretty well covered. The P.39 studies were mostly very brief. the question was 'how many lift/propulsion engines?" Turns out the answer is one, but they did not hold the patents.
BAe P.1216 Supersonic ASTOVL Aircraft: www.harrier.org.uk/P1216.htm

100 Years  - Camel, Hurricane, Harrier: www.kingstonaviation.org

Offline Pioneer

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #49 on: January 30, 2018, 04:13:23 pm »
My goodness hesham, some of those P. 39 designs have a ridiculous amount of lift engines incorporated into them,  whichvI would think emphasised V/TOL as its principle role, as opposed to an actual strike mission  :o

Thanks for sharing the diagram!

Regards
Pioneer
And remember…remember the glory is not the exhortation of war, but the exhortation of man.
Mans nobility, made transcendent in the fiery crucible of war.
Faithfulness and fortitude.
Gentleness and compassion.
I am honored to be your brother.”

— Lt Col Ralph Honner DSO M

Offline Michel Van

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Re: Mirage IIIK
« Reply #50 on: July 21, 2018, 05:15:30 am »
Finally reading  JC Carbonel excellent book "French Secret project 1"

I start to ponder about Mirage IIIK Data from may 1965
it from it size, mass and arms, its match almost aircraft like SEPECAT Jaguar or Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet.
except it's Mach 2.4 top speed. 

in Mid 1960s were several European Air-forces looking for new Aircraft
British wanted an advanced supersonic jet trainer
Germans and French looking for a cheap, subsonic dual role trainer and light attack aircraft. (french: ECAT)
A Memorandum of Understanding was signed in May 1965 by French and British to develop two aircraft, a trainer based on the ECAT, and the larger AFVG.

Here the Mirage IIIK could be a proposal to British to French for ECAT ?
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