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Author Topic: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems  (Read 5310 times)

Offline skylancer-3441

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2018, 09:31:56 am »
another depiction of MICV, which somewhat reminds me of last pic in this post on previous page,
and which was accompanied by this text:
Quote
Mechanized Infantry Combat Vehicle (MICV) (Figure 4)
We are preparing to enter engineering development of a successor to the M113 Armored Personnel Carrier. It is called the MICV - for Mechanized Infantry Combat Vehicle.
It is a new type vehicle to the US Army, and results from the Infantry's decision in 1963 to change Its doctrine to allow comnanders the option to fight from within their personnel carriers.
Studies showed that upgrading or product improving the M113 could not provide a key essential, sufficient mobility, to allow the carrier to accompany the future Main Battle Tank across country. The technique to achieve this will probably be a tube over bar suspension system that permits greater torsion and greater wheel travel than conventional systems. It is a proven component.
We have received authority (and we believe the necessary funds in the FY73 appropriation) to begin building the first prototype vehicles early next calendar year. A special board evaluated bids from the three potential contractors:   FMC, Chrysler, and Pacific Car and Foundry. The contract was awarded to FMC. A single contractor was selected rather than several competitive contractors since the components to be used on MICV, with the exception of the gun, are already proven components.
The gun is to be the BUSHMASTER - a new stabilized automatic weapon now undergoing a competitive development effort by several contractors. It will be in the caliber range of 20-30mm and considerably more effective and store armor penetrating than current guns.
The shock and vibration problems of the MICV are similar to the Main Battle Tank and there will be unique problems associated with the 20-30mm automatic weapons. Combat vehicles In general have been described by some as having a built-in self-destruct capability. This is a very apt description. Wherever a threaded fastener is used on these vehicles - be they on wheeled or to a certain extent tracked vehicles - there is an almost certainty that over a period of time they will work loose. This problem can be attacked in two ways. One is to design the springs and tires so that the vibration body is damped and the energy absorbed at these points. The other is to use self-locking threaded fasteners, or those with fine threads, which are expensive solutions and which complicates the maintenance function. The XM746, Heavy Equipment Transporter is a good example. Much design effort and testing has been devoted to improving the springs, tires and shock absorbers to dampen the vibration and absorb road shock energy. Fasteners have been working loose in the axle cover plates, axle carriers, wheel lugs, door striker - you name it - and there has been a problem. On our M60 series tanks there has been trouble with both welded and bolted brackets and locks for the driver hatch. A great deal of assistance is still needed in these areas for the design of future vehicles and the improvement of current ones.

btw, Infantry 1971-Jan-Feb has Ogorkiewicz's article on ICVs - which is illustrated with another drawing of MICV

/damn. accidentally uploaded same image twice and did not noticed that untill ~15 hours later/
« Last Edit: September 13, 2018, 06:55:28 am by skylancer-3441 »

Offline uk 75

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2018, 10:17:00 am »
Skylancer
Thank you for the drawings and text.
One of them is like the one in Jane's. I wish someone with a copy would post here

Offline skylancer-3441

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2019, 09:33:37 am »
I've tried to ask some Ebay sellers about photo of those pages from their JWS editions,

and so far it turned out that 1973-74 edition has 3 pictures of MICV which I've already seen
and that if 1969-70 edition actually has an article on MICV, illustrated with pictures, - it's NOT on page 280 or on some pages around it.

 (it seems to me that in order to bother seller as little as possible, it's better to ask about photo of particular page, instead of asking them to spend some time searching something they are not interested in, in books which is some 500-700 pages long. Unfortunatelly it's rather hard to find on the internet that page number in 1969-70 edition, given that it's not available on GoogleBooks even in snippet view mode,
and given that i have no idea whether this edition has an proper index of some sort, like later editions of JWS, or - even if it has - where this index is located inside the book /in order to ask seller to find page on MICV in that index, and then make a photo/)


>>and so far it turned out that 1973-74 edition has 3 pictures of MICV which I've already seen
I've posted earlier 1 of those - from Shock and vibration bulletin Vol. 43 p.1 (1973-06) in my previous message,
and another one is a photo of early XM-723 wooden mockup, presumably full-scale - which was a mockup of not-yet-simplified version of XM-723 (with what looks like large sight on top of the turret, which was replaced later with some smaller and simpler sight, apparently in order to reduce cost) - which was also published in Army 1973-10 - attached to this post, and also available
there https://books.google.ru/books?id=AUREAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA130
there https://books.google.ru/books?id=rQAsvTQQMu0C&pg=PA130
and there https://books.google.ru/books?id=VLVyFLeuO1EC&pg=PT456
and last one was widely available b/w photo of XM-701 - for example https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.d0001604859;view=1up;seq=274

BTW, on Ebay I've stumbled across another photo of XM-701
« Last Edit: January 31, 2019, 11:36:09 am by skylancer-3441 »

Offline uk 75

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2019, 11:32:20 am »
Thank you all for helping try and pin down these images.
What is clear from them is that the accounts in all the published sources, notably Hunnicut, are woefully incomplete and there were some very interesting designs being looked at by the US Army.

Online Kadija_Man

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2019, 04:05:30 pm »
You might want to consider that what you are assuming was a working vehicle was actually a wooden mockup with the actual vehicle which was developed looking rather different to it...

Offline skylancer-3441

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2019, 12:55:15 pm »
What is clear from them is that the accounts in all the published sources, notably Hunnicut, are woefully incomplete and there were some very interesting designs being looked at by the US Army.

It seems to me that there are books out there, which probably were not seen by any military vehicles enthusiast, or by anyone else, for years - like this one for example http://library.mit.edu/item/000195603 (and the only reason i've heard about it - is because now-almost-20-years-old "Bradley and How it got that way" mentioned it)


...and another one on that topic - Bruce R. Pirme, From Half-Track to Bradley: Evolution Of the Infantry Fighting Vehicle, CMH, 1987.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2019, 12:58:29 pm by skylancer-3441 »

Online Kadija_Man

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Re: 1967 US MICV mock up in Janes Weapons Systems
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2019, 02:27:51 pm »
What is clear from them is that the accounts in all the published sources, notably Hunnicut, are woefully incomplete and there were some very interesting designs being looked at by the US Army.

It seems to me that there are books out there, which probably were not seen by any military vehicles enthusiast, or by anyone else, for years - like this one for example http://library.mit.edu/item/000195603 (and the only reason i've heard about it - is because now-almost-20-years-old "Bradley and How it got that way" mentioned it)

Not surprising that it really hasn't been seen - it's a university thesis.  Few if any of them are worth reading and fewer are worth publishing...