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Author Topic: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program  (Read 69041 times)

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #330 on: September 11, 2018, 06:31:40 pm »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/09/army-seeks-1000-mile-missiles-vs-russia-china/?utm_campaign=Breaking%20Defense%20Multi%20Domain&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65829443&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8KeFsJy4c54bCBxjhrbJRB_oqSpwBsgTgWw6h3L3sAkMte9k0xills-LuOJsnR-qoft3Z68LQd8uIqaPyZh8hmfmMZ8A&_hsmi=65829443

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WASHINGTON: For the first time since the Soviet Union fell, the Army is developing weapons with a thousand-mile range. That’s roughly five times the range of anything the Army fields today and three times the range of previously announced programs. The payoff in a future war with Russia or China could be dramatic – but the technological, financial and even legal problems are daunting.

The ambition? Develop not one but two types of ultra-long-range missiles to help blow holes in advanced air defenses:

    One Army weapon, not yet officially named, would be a high-performance hypersonic missile, tearing through missile defenses at Mach 5-plus to kill critical hardened targets such as command bunkers.
    The other, the Strategic Long-Range Cannon (SLRC), would use a gun barrel to launch cheaper, slower missiles at larger numbers of softer targets like radars, missile launchers and mobile command posts.

Together with comparable weapons launched from jets, ships, and submarines, these ground-launched “strategic fires” would blast a path for attacking aircraft, from Army helicopters to Air Force bombers. That kind of mutual support – formally known as Multi-Domain Operations – would transform the Army’s role from a consumer of the other services’ support to a full partner in providing long-range firepower.

Need double the range in the Pacific at least.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline sferrin

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #331 on: September 11, 2018, 06:43:42 pm »
"The payoff in a future war with Russia or China could be dramatic – but the technological, financial and even legal problems are daunting."

"Legal"?  Please.  Russia is already in violation of the INF Treaty, we should just withdraw from it.  Nobody else is hamstrung by it except the US.  As for technological, all it requires is will.  It's not like we never built the Pershing II before.

As for a thousand mile range, I guess it depends on how they plan on launching it.  If from sea or land, yep, needs more range if they plan to contend with things like the DF-21 and DF-26.  From air it would be less of an issue.  From land though, they're limited for lack of a TEL and the requirement to be air-transportable. 
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline marauder2048

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #332 on: September 11, 2018, 08:12:25 pm »
"The payoff in a future war with Russia or China could be dramatic – but the technological, financial and even legal problems are daunting."

"Legal"?  Please.  Russia is already in violation of the INF Treaty, we should just withdraw from it.  Nobody else is hamstrung by it except the US.  As for technological, all it requires is will.  It's not like we never built the Pershing II before.

I tend to think ground-launched hypersonic boost-glide would be both INF Treaty and New START compliant.

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #333 on: September 12, 2018, 03:15:12 am »
I think so as well given that it is likely to spend less than 50% of its time in a Ballistic Profile.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline fredymac

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #334 on: September 12, 2018, 06:22:15 am »
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…for the first time since the Soviet Union fell, the Army is developing weapons with a thousand-mile range….

… Strategic Long-Range Cannon (SLRC), would use a gun barrel to launch cheaper, slower missiles at larger numbers of softer targets like radars, missile launchers and mobile command posts…


Is this long range cannon shooting a super LRLAP round or is it just acting like a single cell VLS on wheels?  A ballistic trajectory with a 1000 mile range would go pretty high up.  If it stays low it will have to use a lot more force or propellant.  Unless they are thinking of packing a tiny jet engine behind an artillery round.

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #335 on: September 12, 2018, 08:01:46 pm »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/09/aiming-the-armys-thousand-mile-missiles/?utm_campaign=Breaking%20Defense%20Land&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65865570&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9B4XKXQVV7O_maKxLaKaqNJrxB70vz7NpcRXMGpMa5lfdBx06lg6aDfhcrsvqjLST9QWA4tOCsyRmkqUSO_uSBl7mjhA&_hsmi=65865570

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WASHINGTON: The Army wants new long-range missiles that can shoot a thousand miles. But first it has to figure out how to use them. That requires training a new cadre of Army targeteers to work more closely with the other services than ever before. Why? Because even if the Army can build the new superweapons, it’ll be firing blind unless it is hooked up with the other services’ satellites, planes, and drones to spot targets. The smartest smart weapon is pretty dumb if you don’t know what to shoot at.

What’s more, long-range firepower requires not only long-range sensors to spot targets, but an in-depth planning process that starts long before the first shot is fired. That’s something the other services have done for years for airstrikes, but the Army hasn’t had to. So the service has created an Army Multi-Domain Targeting Center to train a new cadre of joint-certified targeteers.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #336 on: September 12, 2018, 08:06:43 pm »
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/09/will-the-armys-1000-mile-missiles-kill-reagans-inf-treaty/

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WASHINGTON: The arms control community is up in, well, arms over the Army’s plan for missiles with a thousand-mile range. Such weapons could blow holes in Russian or Chinese defenses in a major war – but their first victim may well be an ailing arms control agreement, the INF treaty.

The fundamental questions:

    Is it worth trying to save the treaty, even though the Russians are cheating and the Chinese never signed?
    Is it better to void a treaty that binds our hands and build new weapons, even at the risk of an arms race?
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #337 on: September 21, 2018, 04:19:46 pm »
Spending bill shifts OCO funding to base for IM-SHORAD


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Congressional appropriators are supporting the Army's interim project to bolster maneuver forces in Europe against air and missile threats entirely through the base budget, following a trend to commit some of the service's assets in the region to long-term funding.

The fiscal year 2019 spending bill adopted by the Senate last week includes a $23 million transfer from the Overseas Contingency Operations account to the base account for the Initial Maneuver-Short-Range Air Defense, or IM-SHORAD, program, a battalion-level capability to be mounted on the Stryker combat vehicle.

The total $79 million in base research, development, test and evaluation funding also includes a $39 million decrease due to "program growth ahead of acquisition strategy."

The Army's vice chief of staff has approved a directed requirement for 144 systems by FY-22. The service plans to procure an initial prototype through an other transaction agreement by the end of FY-18, according to Steve Miller, operations chief in the Army's Cruise Missile Defense Systems project office.

The service aims to use the interim system, deemed an urgent need in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve, to provide stability to Stryker and armored brigade combat teams and reassure NATO allies.

IM-SHORAD is the first part of the layered capability the Army envisions for air and missile defense, with any future system intended to complement the Indirect Fire Protection Capability.

The Army has chosen Leonardo DRS to supply the mission equipment package for IM-SHORAD, which includes Raytheon's Stinger missile.

The service's early efforts for SHORAD are focused on the Stinger and the humvee-mounted Avenger air defense system.

Meanwhile, the FY-19 spending bill cut $17.6 million from the Avenger modifications line in procurement funding, cited as "ahead of need" for IM-SHORAD.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #338 on: September 25, 2018, 10:10:38 pm »
https://www.defensenews.com/land/2018/09/17/us-army-weapons-and-munitions-tech-development-get-congressional-cash-injection/

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WASHINGTON — U.S. Army weapons and munitions technology development is getting a big cash injection in the fiscal 2019 spending bill, which emerged from conference committee late Sept. 13.

Research, development, technology and evaluation dollars for weapons and munitions technology saw a $343 million boost in the appropriations bill expected to be voted on by both chambers this week. The Army had requested just $40.44 million in RDT&E funding to improve weapons and munitions, but lawmakers are providing a total $383.44 million.

Additionally, the bill adds $139.68 million to the Army’s RDT&E budget for weapons and munitions advanced technology. The Army requested just $102 million in FY19.

A large portion of the funding is targeted at the Army’s top modernization priority — Long Range Precision Fires.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #339 on: October 02, 2018, 06:09:03 pm »
From Inside Defense pay site

Army eyeing new high-mobility howitzer acquisition for Stryker units in 2020s

The Army is soliciting industry for information on a potential replacement for its Stryker Brigade Combat Teams' towed cannons, a prelude to a potential "High Mobility SBCT Howitzer" program the service is considering launching in the early 2020s.
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This focus on firepower makes me speculate what Russia was doing in Crimea/Ukraine with artillery and missile/rocket batteries opened some eyes at the Pentagon.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #340 on: October 13, 2018, 02:18:40 pm »
https://csbaonline.org/research/publications/air-and-missile-defense-at-a-crossroads-new-concepts-and-technologies-to-de

AIR AND MISSILE DEFENSE AT A CROSSROADS: New Concepts and Technologies to Defend America’s Overseas Bases
October 3, 2018 Mark Gunzinger, Carl Rehberg
Resources: Future Warfare & Concepts

Mark Gunzinger and Carl Rehberg address how DoD could take advantage of mature technologies to develop higher capacity and more cost-effective air and missile defenses for its overseas bases. It assesses the potential for a layered, distributed defense that integrates multiple new non-kinetic and kinetic systems to defeat salvo attacks.
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Study at the link
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #341 on: October 13, 2018, 06:57:19 pm »
From Inside Defense pay site

Army eyeing new high-mobility howitzer acquisition for Stryker units in 2020s

The Army is soliciting industry for information on a potential replacement for its Stryker Brigade Combat Teams' towed cannons, a prelude to a potential "High Mobility SBCT Howitzer" program the service is considering launching in the early 2020s.
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This focus on firepower makes me speculate what Russia was doing in Crimea/Ukraine with artillery and missile/rocket batteries opened some eyes at the Pentagon.

https://www.fbo.gov/index.php?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=e4630452e91e9530ad3851c999867355&tab=core&_cview=0
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bobbymike

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #342 on: October 16, 2018, 06:30:10 am »
http://aviationweek.com/defense/us-army-launches-sweeping-long-range-artillery-modernization-plan?utm_rid=CPEN1000000230026&utm_campaign=16981&utm_medium=email&elq2=006a19db7855491d91b527f6932a64de

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In 17 years of fighting in Afghanistan, the maximum range of the U.S. Army’s artillery batteries never seemed like a problem. If a ground unit needing indirect fire support drifted beyond the range of the nearest artillery battery, the soldiers could simply summon air support by fighters or bombers, which roamed over the country’s airspace with near-impunity.

Those assumptions are still relevant in Afghanistan but, the Army insists, in few other operational theaters. The National Defense Strategy unveiled last January reorients U.S. military forces to prepare for competition with Russia and China, which, unlike Afghan insurgents, operate sophisticated air defenses that render close air support missions problematic.
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.

Charles W. Eliot

Offline sferrin

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Re: Army Indirect Fire Protection System and New Guided Missile Program
« Reply #343 on: October 16, 2018, 06:57:52 am »
U.S. military forces to prepare for competition with Russia and China, which, unlike Afghan insurgents, operate sophisticated air defenses that render close air support missions problematic.
[/quote]

But. . .but, I was told the A-10 was invincible.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.