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Author Topic: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses  (Read 47785 times)

Offline Dragon029

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #30 on: June 18, 2014, 08:06:33 am »
1) Is probably better served with regular exoskeleton technology, as the only methods that can provide sufficient energy recovery require notable extra weight or would further interfere with a soldier's gait, which will lead to foot injuries far quicker (the exoskeleton in the first place may cause issues with that, but if you're using some extra soft mechanism in the soles of the boot, that's likely going to cause extra friction for the foot and lead to quick-appearing blisters).

2) Lightweight and flexible armour is great, but I hope you were using crawling through fences as an indicator, not an intended purpose (that kind of action would be very rare; your fences are either (practically) non-existent or impenetrable to a human with or without armour).

3) Is something is something I'm really surprised doesn't exist; flash detection maybe not, but there already exists a few systems that can fairly accurately predict sources of fire through acoustics. Integrate it into a streamline helmet attachment and put hydrophobic coatings over the microphones and I don't see why it couldn't be put into service today (general infantry might be a bit irresponsible with the equipment, but just like M203's or M249's, you don't need every soldier to carry one.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #31 on: June 18, 2014, 12:57:44 pm »



Quote
The Prowler, is Revision’s Human Augmentation device.  It increases a soldiers metabolic reserve while preventing short and long term injuries.  The Prowler allows our soldiers to be more lethal on the objective while increasing deployability through reduced injury.  The Prowler, has been tested by SOCOM and CANSOFCOM, and is under contract with the US Army Labs Natick.  Shown to provide a 33% mechanical advantage, the Prowler proves to be the next human augmentation system.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #32 on: June 18, 2014, 01:12:37 pm »
More images of the Prowler from the other company involved, B-Temia (they actually manufacture it not Revision).

http://www.b-temia.com










Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #33 on: June 18, 2014, 01:13:16 pm »

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #34 on: June 23, 2014, 04:25:31 pm »
I hope this fits the criteria for the thread?



Russian army "future soldier" stuff.
Google translation
 
Quote
Soon the Russian army will receive a new generation combat gear.  Now she is going through a cycle of military trials in different climatic zones.  To supplying the formations and units of the new Ministry of Defense outfit was dedicated to a special meeting, chaired by Deputy Prime Minister and MIC chairman Dmitry Rogozin.
 The meeting was held in Moscow Klimovsk based TSNIITOCHMASH - leading research institute for the development of small arms and remedies for the Armed Forces and the various law enforcement agencies.  It was attended by almost all the heads of the leading designers and national defense related occupational with the manufacture of small arms, ammunition and personal protective equipment.
 Dmitry Rogozin said that "attention given to this issue at different levels can be easily explained, since the use of military equipment is being addressed the vast majority of combat missions in local conflicts, and special counter-terrorist operations."
 Indeed, there are times when, for example, motostrelok went into battle, at best, a bulletproof vest, and even without it in the past.  Outfit of the modern soldier makes him look like a cyborg fiction.  The soldier is not just a shooter, but a full-fledged combat unit with good protection and individual controls.  Fighting equipment includes functionally and structurally linked, elements of five major systems: the defeat, defense, intelligence and control, life support, and even energy.



In addition to equipment, developed in the interests of the Defense Ministry, Dmitry Rogozin shown and the one that is produced to protect the anti-terrorism special forces soldiers.  This "Centurion", "Sherpa", "Legionnaire", "Gladiator".  According to the developers, it is much better that that is used by the similar units abroad.

 


rest at the link
http://www.rg.ru/2014/03/14/soveshanie-site.html
















Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2014, 04:29:51 pm »
More pics..










Offline ouroboros

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #36 on: June 28, 2014, 06:23:49 pm »
I hope this fits the criteria for the thread?



Russian army "future soldier" stuff.




Wow, starting to look like something straight out of a video game...

The velcro on the front of the handshield so you can temporarily stick it onto velcroed areas of a uniform/armor to free your hands is a nice touch (assuming no unit badge was supposed to be there). There seemed to be a lot of velcro on the overall suit, much more than needed for unit badges and such.

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #37 on: July 05, 2014, 02:00:23 pm »
Pics of the Polish armys project "Tytan" protypes future soldier ensembles.











Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #38 on: July 05, 2014, 02:11:22 pm »
More pics

















Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #39 on: July 05, 2014, 02:35:26 pm »
Quote
Poland orders Tytan soldier system
 
 Remigiusz Wilk, Warsaw - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
 
 27 June 2014
 
 
  Polish Army Tytan future soldier system. Source: PHO
 
 The Polish Armament Inspectorate signed two contracts on 27 June for the Tytan (Titan) future soldier system worth more than USD1.5 billion.
 
 Under a framework agreement, the Polish Ministry of Defence (MoD) will finance research and development for the 27 different subcomponents within Tytan, and will retain intellectual rights over the system.
 
 The framework agreement also guarantees that the companies involved in the development of the Tytan system will receive an order for at least 14,000 equipment sets between 2018 and 2022. This values the framework agreement at about PLN5 billion (USD1.63 billion), and doesn't include some of the Tytan subcomponent developments, such as the MSBS-5.56 modular firearms family, that are financed independently from the Tytan programme.
 
 The second agreement completes negotiations between the 13 different organisations involved in the Tytan programme. These are: PCO, Polish Defence Holding (PHO), Bumar Elektronika, FB Lucznik, PSO Maskpol, WB Electronics, WAT, MESKO, ZM Dezamet, WIML, WIHE, RADMOR, and ZM Tarnow.
 
 Speaking following the contract signings, Deputy Defence Minister Czeslaw Mroczek said: "The Polish industry has given a long-term contract for couple of billions zlotys, which gives Polish industry solid base for long-standing existence.
 
 "The agreement gives industry the guarantee to keep the Tytan programme running even if the government changes in next election." According to Mroczek, the MoD is also keen to support potential export sales of the Tytan system.
 
 The first phase of the project will see the creation and integration of the 27 different parts of the Tytan soldier system. These include five different subsystem sets: C4I; observation and reconnaissance (including various weapon sights); armament and ammunition; clothing; ballistic protection; and nuclear, biological, and chemical protection. A new camouflage pattern for the Polish Army will also be developed.
 
 The first phase of research and development will conclude in 2015, and will be followed by a test and qualification phase running until 2017. The first low-rate initial production Tytan sets will be tested by the 17 Mechanized Brigade from Miedzyrzecz. when this has been completed, serial production is scheduled to start in 2018.

Online Triton

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #40 on: July 05, 2014, 06:20:28 pm »
"U.S. Military Turns to Hollywood to Outfit the Soldier of the Future"
Designer of 'Iron Man' Suit Among Those Working on High-Tech Gear for Elite Troops

by Dion Nissenbaum

Source:
http://online.wsj.com/articles/u-s-military-turns-to-hollywood-to-outfit-the-soldier-of-the-future-1404527893

Quote
SAN FERNANDO, Calif.—The Oscar-nominated designers at Legacy Effects have outfitted such memorable movie warriors as The Terminator, RoboCop, Captain America and Iron Man.

The special-effects company is now at work on what seems a mission impossible: Building an Iron Man-style suit to protect and propel elite U.S. troops by encasing them in body armor equipped with an agile exoskeleton to enable troops to carry hundreds of pounds of gear.

The 3-D printers that once churned out parts for actor Robert Downey Jr.'s red and gold movie armor are making pieces for a Pentagon prototype. Military officials recently examined three designs, an early step in a project by the U.S. Special Operations Command to create a new generation of protective armor within the next four years.

"We are trying to be revolutionary," said Mike Fieldson, the military's manager of the project known as TALOS, the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit.

Joining the quest is a far-flung team of bioengineers, combat veterans, tech experts and a Canadian researcher seeking solutions from the secrets of insect armor. The companies include prop makers, small tech firms and such defense titans as Raytheon Co. RTN +0.81% , Lockheed Martin Corp. LMT +0.58% and General Dynamics. GD +0.45%

The suit could change the way the U.S. military fights wars. For years, American forces have worked to shed pounds from the load they carried through the war zones of Iraq and Afghanistan—more than 125 pounds on some missions, including weapons, electronics and body armor.

Developers of the Iron Man suit say it could weigh as much as 400 pounds, requiring a powered exoskeleton to move the armored troops with speed and agility. The problem is existing exoskeletons can't do the job.

"Hollywood has definitely made the Iron Man suit impossibly thin, impossibly light, impossibly agile and impossibly energy efficient," said Russ Angold, co-founder of Ekso Bionics, a Richmond, Calif., company that primarily designs exoskeletons for medical use. "So we're really trying to solve the problem and ask the question: What would Iron Man look like if it was real?"

This isn't the Pentagon's first crack at a futuristic combat suit. The military has spent tens of millions of dollars over the years on prototypes that didn't work as planned. Past failings have raised concerns among lawmakers about the year-old initiative.

Special Operations Command has so far spent about $10 million. Since it isn't an official Pentagon program, there is no fixed budget. That worries some lawmakers, and the House Armed Services Committee recently asked for a briefing to make sure the project doesn't waste money.

"You can see the long-term vision but, for now, much of it remains in the realm of science fiction and entertainment," said Peter Singer, a senior fellow with the New America Foundation's Future of War project. "There's a long way to go, but the technical barriers are not insurmountable."

One of the biggest hurdles is power. Iron Man's fictional defense contractor Tony Stark developed the mini "arc reactor"—worn in his chest—to power the suit. There is no real-world equivalent, and project developers joke about it.

"Iron Man got it right: It's all about the arc reactor," Mr. Angold said. "If someone can come up with that it would be fantastic."

Mr. Angold and his team work in a converted red brick Ford Motor Co. factory that made tanks during World War II. The office has the feel of a tech startup, with high ceilings, open workspaces and a pool table. Bulky exoskeletons designed in partnership with Lockheed Martin hang on a rack, next to cardboard boxes of junked knee braces, helmets, shoulder pads, boots and hinges from early Iron Man suit designs.

Pentagon researchers estimate they need 365 pounds of batteries to power the kind of suit developers have in mind. Researchers are looking at a small engine, designed for drones, as a substitute.

The vexing power problem has prompted the military to ask a Canadian researcher to develop an unpowered exoskeleton alternative. To help solve the dilemma, the Canadian team is studying sumo wrestlers to figure out how 600-pound men can move so deftly.

"This is a new frontier," said Alain Bujold, founder of Mawashi Protective Clothing Inc., a Quebec company that has developed exoskeletons and protective suits by studying creatures with hard shells—insects, lobsters and armadillos.

If developers can build a functional suit, it will "change the way that the operator does business—and probably not in a small way," said one member of U.S. Special Operations Command involved in the program.

The prototypes are designed for three members of Special Operations Forces who are taking part in the testing. The teams have taken computerized body scans and developed mannequins of the men to tailor the suits.

"If we don't do something to help our soldiers they are going to continue to break," said David Audet, an Army official who has spent years overseeing innovative technology programs at the Natick Soldier Research, Development & Engineering Center in Massachusetts. "We're asking them to carry loads that are just absurd."

In May, Mr. Audet traveled to a small Vermont dairy farm to meet Iron Man suit developers as they put one of the early designs through its paces at a rudimentary shooting range set up away from the milking barns.

The daylong tests offered a sobering check. A U.S. soldier trying out the suit had trouble running, diving and shooting with the metal exoskeleton strapped to his legs. And that was before he added the cooling system and other advanced components still to come.

"Will you ever have an Iron Man? I don't know," said Brian Dowling, a former Green Beret overseeing the project for Revision Military in Vermont. "But you'll have some greatly improved technology along the way."

Developers working on new suits for U.S. troops have studied Hollywood creations, along with Medieval armor, above. Chelsea Hamashin/U.S. Special Operations Command

The tipping point for the development program came in December 2012, officials said, when members of the SEAL Team Six converged on a compound in eastern Afghanistan to free a Colorado doctor held hostage by militants.

As commandos stormed the compound, and freed the doctor, one SEAL was shot and killed. Afterward, Adm. William McRaven, the head of U.S. Special Operations Command who oversaw the SEAL Team Six raid in Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden in 2011, decided his forces needed better protection.

"It was one of those incidents where we stepped back and asked, 'What's our long-term vision?' " said James "Hondo" Geurts, the Pentagon official who oversees acquisition programs for Adm. McRaven. "We've done about all we can with our current approach. Is it time to take a bold leap ahead?"

The military has embraced the superhero imagery in its pursuit of the Iron Man suit. The first video to promote the program showed bullets bouncing off an animated Iron Man soldier as he burst through a locked door.

President Barack Obama even invoked the movie hero to a White House audience in February. "I am here to announce that we are building Iron Man," Mr. Obama joked, while promoting innovative technology programs. "This has been a secret project we've been working on for a long time. Not really. Maybe. It's classified."

As the project advanced, Mr. Angold invited the people who made the original Iron Man suits to join. If Legacy could design functional suits for the movies, he figured, maybe they could do it for the military.

"When you're doing something for a movie it is all make-believe," said Lindsay MacGowan, one of Legacy Effects' founders. Computer-generated special effects take care of the suit's imagined technology, like flying, for instance. "Whereas, for the military," he said, "that's really not going to be the case."

In early May, as the deadline for the first prototypes neared, the U.S. Special Operations Command took over a private warehouse on the edge of a St. Petersburg lagoon, not far from the command's Tampa headquarters. The walls are covered with inspirational storyboard illustrations of soldiers diving from planes in winged suits.

U.S. Special Operations Command is trying to fast-track development by sidestepping traditional contracting rules that can bog down projects in years of proposals, testing and evaluation. They have filled the warehouse with scores of developers divided into teams.

Prop makers use foam helmets and chest plates to test suit designs to see what works. A team led by a onetime Houston Astros player, Brad Chedister, is analyzing the widely criticized Under Armour body suit designed for U.S. Olympic speed skaters for its insulating properties. Another group is seeing if the drone engine can really power a commando in a heavy, armored suit.

One researcher, whose pastime is Renaissance-era sword fights, donated medieval suits of armor for developers to study.

The prototype suits are unlikely to look as good as anything on the big screen, designers say.

"This one won't be flying anytime soon, and it won't be red or gold, but it will be something that is in the history books," Mr. MacGowan said.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2014, 06:48:26 pm by Triton »

Offline muttbutt

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #41 on: July 06, 2014, 02:24:23 pm »
This is the Franco-Swiss RB-3D lower body exo skeleton mounted with ballistic armour etc at this year Eurosatory mil expo

Looks awkward as hell  :o

video of it "in action"....


Offline bobbymike

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2014, 02:53:59 pm »
This is the Franco-Swiss RB-3D lower body exo skeleton mounted with ballistic armour etc at this year Eurosatory mil expo

Looks awkward as hell  :o

video of it "in action"....


Until they mount a Dillon Aero minigun I'm not interested  ;D

http://www.special-ops.org/heads-up-at-natick-for-better-helmets/
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Offline lastdingo

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #43 on: July 06, 2014, 04:38:35 pm »
(...)

About those photos of helmets:

A German experimental archaelogist has done experiments with recovered Roman face masks.
They were made for looks, but turned out to offer significant protection as well.

The eye openings were tiny, but unlike many medieval helmets with tiny vision slits these ancient masks were fitting tight and had the slits close to the eyes. The field of view was actually satisfactory.


So IF almost no transparent material shall be used for a face mask, the way to go in regard to field of view is to make the vision ports very close to the eyes.
Those photos show helmets which violate this basic, geometry-driven, rule.

Offline Dragon029

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Re: Exoskeleton Systems For Military and Civil Uses
« Reply #44 on: July 06, 2014, 10:11:24 pm »
The problem with that however is that you run into 2 issues:

1. Helmets are not rigidly attached to the head, and so impacts could mean damaging the eyes (by having the visor move back into the eyes).

2. To have the helmet still accommodate the nose, jaw and ears, as well as systems like hearing protection, cooling, telephony, vision augmentation systems, etc you would need to make the eyes a local minimum, or effectively, bullet traps.