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Author Topic: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile  (Read 64276 times)

Offline SpudmanWP

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2012, 11:36:06 am »
LOBL is "Lock On Before Launch"

I think you meant LOAL "Lock On After Launch".
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Offline sferrin

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2012, 12:06:13 pm »
This is such a good idea it will most certainly go nowhere.
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Offline Rafael

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2012, 04:56:24 pm »
I'd assume that multi-role would mean both BVR and WVR modes... It'd be asking too much for an ATG mode (That said I've always liked the AGM-122 Sidearm).

Noted, never thought of it, but I'm still in the foggy terrain of speculation.

LOBL is "Lock On Before Launch"

I think you meant LOAL "Lock On After Launch".

I meant LOBL, in the sense that, using  Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS) or own radar, the munition can be locked on *before* the launch event, while still stowed inside the bay. Not intending to deny LOAL at all, though. But I'm still speculating.

Offline SpudmanWP

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2012, 07:15:03 pm »
LOBL & LOAL refer to a seeker's own ability to detect and guide the missile to the target.

LOBL can never happen while a missile is in a bay.  The missile must acquire the target on it's own prior to launch to be called LOBL. 

The Aim-9M in the F-22 is just this type.  The -9M is moved into the slipstream for as long as it takes for the seeker to acquire the target (LOBL).  It is then, and only then, that it is launched.

The F-22's AMRAAM is a true LOAL missile.  The F-22 tracks a target & communicates with the AMRAAM as to where the target is.  It then opens its doors and ejects the missile.  If the target is close enough, the AMRAAM will immediately begin to seek out the target as it travels towards the target.  If the target is farther away, the AMRAAM will fly towards the target for some distance before activating its own seeker.
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Offline BDF

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2012, 12:00:19 am »

The possibilities for this concept are tantalizing.  Imagine if they can match or come close to early AMRAAM iterations in kinetic capabilities.  I think it might be a stretch unless they've developed higher density propellants BUT one could envision a AMRAAM replacement evolving from this concept if it does work out.  I like Spuds idea of F-22s carrying 4 -120Ds, 4 CUDAs and 2 -9X, especially if your CUDAs get -120A like range.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2012, 09:54:57 am »
Four air-launched ESSMs, four CUDAs, two AIM-9Xs.  B)
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Offline Rafael

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2012, 10:09:39 am »
LOBL & LOAL refer to a seeker's own ability to detect and guide the missile to the target.

Thanks for the explanation, Spudman. That clarifies much of the misconceptions I had.


Offline Avimimus

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2012, 10:24:53 am »
It is also worth noting that the active-radar seeker has a relatively short range, and is used for terminal homing - it is dependent on the aircraft's radar for acquisition and initial guidance (assuming it is being fired from more than 15-25 km).

Offline sferrin

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2012, 10:32:57 am »
It is also worth noting that the active-radar seeker has a relatively short range, and is used for terminal homing - it is dependent on the aircraft's radar for acquisition and initial guidance (assuming it is being fired from more than 15-25 km).

It's also worth noting that both the AIM-120 and previous Phoenix could go active right from the get go for short range shots.
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Offline quellish

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2012, 02:31:29 pm »
Interesting THAAD is interesting.

Offline Rafael

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2012, 02:33:30 pm »
Interesting THAAD is interesting.

Do you refer to THAAD for the choice of kill mechanism?

Offline SpudmanWP

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2012, 02:55:51 pm »
Four air-launched ESSMs, four CUDAs, two AIM-9Xs.  B)
Take it to the next level...

Strap a 71" x 7" booster on the back of the CUDA for an ALRAAM.  Kind of like GD AIM-152 without the multi-mode seeker.  Direct, long-ranged AMRAAM replacement.

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Offline Avimimus

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2012, 03:49:26 pm »
It is also worth noting that the active-radar seeker has a relatively short range, and is used for terminal homing - it is dependent on the aircraft's radar for acquisition and initial guidance (assuming it is being fired from more than 15-25 km).

It's also worth noting that both the AIM-120 and previous Phoenix could go active right from the get go for short range shots.

Yes it is.

Active-radar homing has always had a bit of a medium range / dogfight mystique to it. Isn't this kind-of the point of ARH?

Offline Abraham Gubler

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2012, 10:46:45 pm »
Take it to the next level...

Strap a 71" x 7" booster on the back of the CUDA for an ALRAAM.  Kind of like GD AIM-152 without the multi-mode seeker.  Direct, long-ranged AMRAAM replacement.

There already is a two stage AMRAAM, the Raytheon NCADE. It is configured for BMD with the AIM-9X IR seeker and hit to kill but you could use the two stage rocket motors with an air to air active radar seeker and anti aircraft hit to kill warhead.
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Offline Void

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Re: Lockheed Martin CUDA Air-to-Air Missile
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2012, 03:47:12 am »
Active-radar homing has always had a bit of a medium range / dogfight mystique to it. Isn't this kind-of the point of ARH?

Speeed.

Because IR domes are physically weak, draggy and the performance of IR seekers drops with increasing missiles speed (turbulence and heating of the seeker dome are both problems) it is not a good choice for high speed missiles. I would guess that CUDA is radar guided, because CUDA has a very high burnout speed.

High velocity dovetails nicely with HTK guidance. Removing the warhead reduces the empty weight of the missile, and thrusters can produce enough force to perform tight turns even at very high speed. It also reduces the reaction time for the target and increases the lethality of the missile on impact.