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Author Topic: SpaceX (general discussion)  (Read 219200 times)

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1485 on: February 04, 2019, 08:10:19 am »
I wonder how much longer they will put resources into fairing recovery being as F9 is a dead end technologically speaking for the company.

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1486 on: February 04, 2019, 08:43:33 am »
I wonder how much longer they will put resources into fairing recovery being as F9 is a dead end technologically speaking for the company.
I think they'll continue to futz with it until they retire F9. Dead end it may be, it's still the meat of their business right now. The tinkering with code/ops they're doing to make recovery happen isn't draining much if anything from the SuperHeavy/Starship program right now.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1487 on: February 04, 2019, 12:13:00 pm »
There’s some more details about the first firing of the flight Raptor in this article.

https://spacenews.com/spacex-tests-flight-version-of-raptor-engine/

I didn’t realise there was such a big gap in power between it and the BE-4.

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1488 on: February 04, 2019, 03:38:31 pm »
There’s some more details about the first firing of the flight Raptor in this article.

https://spacenews.com/spacex-tests-flight-version-of-raptor-engine/

I didn’t realise there was such a big gap in power between it and the BE-4.
Supposedly the fully developed sea-level motor will be more powerful than BE-4, which is a great deal bigger than Raptor, but they're going forward with this version to get the program going. Merlin went through some serious upgrades as it went along too.

Offline Michel Van

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1489 on: February 04, 2019, 11:05:38 pm »
There are allot difference between the BE-4 and Raptor

While BE-4 is a traditional a staged-combustion Engine
is the Raptor  a  full-flow staged combustion design 

Was tested in Engines like RD-270 or the Aerojet Rocketdyne Integrated powerhead demonstration, but never flow into space.
i guess that SpaceX went for full-flow staged combustion for option to increase performance later on.

Scott Manley on topic
   

SpaceX test ignition of Flight Raptor


according this news site
Is Starship/Superheavy undergoing again design changes so in vage statement by Musk on Twitter
who announce a presentation about that in March/April 2019 after the TestFlight in Texas are done

Flight manifesto
19 February Falcon9 with private Moon lander
7 March Second flight of Falcon Heavy
during March the much delayed Dragon 2 test flight ( thanks for that Trump  >:(   )

I love Strange Technology

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1490 on: February 06, 2019, 08:25:02 am »
March 2nd official (for now!):

https://twitter.com/commercial_crew/status/1093178143685439489

PR:

Quote
NASA, Partners Update Commercial Crew Launch Dates

NASA and its Commercial Crew Program providers Boeing and SpaceX have agreed to move the target launch dates for the upcoming inaugural test flights of their next generation American spacecraft and rockets that will launch astronauts to the International Space Station.

The agency now is targeting March 2 for launch of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon on its uncrewed Demo-1 test flight. Boeing’s uncrewed Orbital Flight Test is targeted for launch no earlier than April.

These adjustments allow for completion of necessary hardware testing, data verification, remaining NASA and provider reviews, as well as training of flight controllers and mission managers.

The uncrewed test flights will be the first time commercially-built and operated American spacecraft designed for humans will dock to the space station. The first flights are dress rehearsals for missions with astronauts aboard the vehicles. Commercial crew has continued working toward these historic missions throughout the month of January.

“The uncrewed flight tests are a great dry run for not only our hardware, but for our team to get ready for our crewed flight tests,” said Kathy Lueders, Commercial Crew Program manager. “NASA has been working together with SpaceX and Boeing to make sure we are ready to conduct these test flights and get ready to learn critical information that will further help us to fly our crews safely. We always learn from tests.”

In January, SpaceX successfully completed a static fire test of its Falcon 9 with Crew Dragon atop the rocket at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida, in preparation for Demo-1.

Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner continues to undergo testing in preparation for its Orbital Flight Test, and United Launch Alliance is conducting final processing of the Atlas V rocket that will launch Starliner from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

“There still are many critical steps to complete before launch and while we eagerly are anticipating these launches, we will step through our test flight preparations and readiness reviews,” said Lueders. “We are excited about seeing the hardware we have followed through development, integration, and ground testing move into flight.”

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program will return human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil, providing safe, reliable and cost-effective access to low-Earth orbit and the space station on systems that meet safety and performance requirements.

To meet NASA’s requirements, the commercial providers must demonstrate their systems are ready to begin regular flights to the space station. After the uncrewed flight tests, Boeing and SpaceX will complete a flight test with crew prior to being certified by NASA for crew rotation missions. The following planning dates reflect inputs by the Commercial Crew Program and the two companies and are current as of Feb. 4, 2019.

Test Flight Planning Dates:

SpaceX Demo-1 (uncrewed): March 2, 2019
Boeing Orbital Flight Test (uncrewed): NET April 2019
Boeing Pad Abort Test: NET May 2019
SpaceX In-Flight Abort Test: June 2019
SpaceX Demo-2 (crewed): July 2019
Boeing Crew Flight Test (crewed): NET August 2019

SpaceX also completed a pad abort test in 2015. Following the test flights, NASA will review performance data and resolve any necessary issues to certify the systems for operational missions. Boeing, SpaceX and the Commercial Crew Program are actively working to be ready for the operational missions. As with all human spaceflight vehicle development, learning from each test and adjusting as necessary to reduce risk to the crew may override planning dates.

Author Anna HeineyPosted on February 6, 2019Categories Boeing, CCtCap, Commercial Spaceflight, International Space Station, Kennedy Space Center, NASA Astronauts, SpaceX

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1491 on: February 07, 2019, 10:14:58 am »
SpaceX’s Starship engine hits twice the thrust of Merlin just days after test debut

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SpaceX CEO Elon Musk says that the company’s Raptor engine – static-fired for the first time at full scale barely four days ago – has been successfully fired at roughly 90% max thrust, briefly producing more than twice the force of one of Falcon 9’s Merlin 1D engines.

Relying on SpaceX’s McGregor, Texas test facilities for its testing, Raptor was being fed with propellant significantly warmer than the supercool liquid methane and oxygen it was nominally designed to use. Even still, the 172 tons (380,000 lbf) of thrust it produced is apparently already enough to satisfy the design requirements of Starship and Super Heavy, and Musk believes that with properly cooled propellant, the same Raptor engine could produce more than 200 tons of thrust at full throttle.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1492 on: February 08, 2019, 03:56:42 am »
Lawmakers: Air Force launch procurement strategy undermines SpaceX

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In a Feb. 4 letter addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Ken Calvert argue that the Air Force launch procurement plan creates an unfair playing field

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1493 on: February 08, 2019, 04:19:37 am »
Lawmakers: Air Force launch procurement strategy undermines SpaceX

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In a Feb. 4 letter addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Ken Calvert argue that the Air Force launch procurement plan creates an unfair playing field

I could see why they'd give money to Blue Origin over SpaceX (SpaceX is already rolling) but I'd like to see their rational for giving money to ULA over SpaceX.  Maybe they really want that upper stage? So stick it on a Falcon. 
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1494 on: February 08, 2019, 08:09:59 am »
Lawmakers: Air Force launch procurement strategy undermines SpaceX

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In a Feb. 4 letter addressed to Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Ken Calvert argue that the Air Force launch procurement plan creates an unfair playing field

I could see why they'd give money to Blue Origin over SpaceX (SpaceX is already rolling) but I'd like to see their rational for giving money to ULA over SpaceX.  Maybe they really want that upper stage? So stick it on a Falcon.
That's the easy one: there's a ton of fomer DoD at ULA, and Senators for ULA include the very powerful Mike Lee and Dick Shelby. They were always getting money, and will continue to do so whatever the outcome of this criticism from the House.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 08:11:38 am by Moose »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1495 on: February 08, 2019, 09:46:42 am »
Follow this new Twitter thread by Mr Musk.

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1093916850931539968

Quote from: Everyday Astronaut
Since you talked about maybe incorporating the fins / landing legs like the Starship has on the booster, can we expect the booster to belly flop and bleed off velocity through atmosphere more effectively like Starship? Or will it come back engines first like F9?

Quote from: Elon Musk
Booster center of mass is much lower & more consistent (no payload mass to consider), so still biases towards engine first entry

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1496 on: February 09, 2019, 02:50:41 am »
SpaceX Texas Launch Site Risks Being Split in Two by Border Wall

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX has a big stake in the battle over border security being waged in Congress: a launchpad on the U.S.-Mexico border that it plans to use for rockets carrying humans around the world and eventually to Mars.

Democratic lawmakers have taken up the cause of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and are trying to thwart the Trump administration’s efforts to build a border barrier that could cut across the company’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico coast near Brownsville.

Lawmakers said they’re concerned about the impact on the company’s 50-acre facility after seeing a Department of Homeland Security map showing a barrier running through what they describe as a launchpad.

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1497 on: February 09, 2019, 08:48:04 am »
SpaceX Texas Launch Site Risks Being Split in Two by Border Wall

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Elon Musk’s SpaceX has a big stake in the battle over border security being waged in Congress: a launchpad on the U.S.-Mexico border that it plans to use for rockets carrying humans around the world and eventually to Mars.

Democratic lawmakers have taken up the cause of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and are trying to thwart the Trump administration’s efforts to build a border barrier that could cut across the company’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico coast near Brownsville.

Lawmakers said they’re concerned about the impact on the company’s 50-acre facility after seeing a Department of Homeland Security map showing a barrier running through what they describe as a launchpad.

Can we just not?  I'm sure it would take all of 2.37 seconds to change the proposed path once it was pointed out SpaceX needed the land.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 08:51:14 am by sferrin »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1498 on: February 09, 2019, 09:10:27 am »
SpaceX Texas Launch Site Risks Being Split in Two by Border Wall

Quote
Elon Musk’s SpaceX has a big stake in the battle over border security being waged in Congress: a launchpad on the U.S.-Mexico border that it plans to use for rockets carrying humans around the world and eventually to Mars.

Democratic lawmakers have taken up the cause of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and are trying to thwart the Trump administration’s efforts to build a border barrier that could cut across the company’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico coast near Brownsville.

Lawmakers said they’re concerned about the impact on the company’s 50-acre facility after seeing a Department of Homeland Security map showing a barrier running through what they describe as a launchpad.

Can we just not?  I'm sure it would take all of 2.37 seconds to change the proposed path once it was pointed out SpaceX needed the land.
You're sure? DHS has not been super willing to change the path for other businesses and private private owners along the border. Bending for SpaceX without an exceptional reason would open them up to numerous legal challenges, on top those they're already dealing with. If this were a case of "oh, sure, we'll move it sorry to bother you" I doubt we'd be seeing a second round of these articles after the first in December.

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1499 on: February 09, 2019, 09:43:49 am »
SpaceX Texas Launch Site Risks Being Split in Two by Border Wall

Quote
Elon Musk’s SpaceX has a big stake in the battle over border security being waged in Congress: a launchpad on the U.S.-Mexico border that it plans to use for rockets carrying humans around the world and eventually to Mars.

Democratic lawmakers have taken up the cause of Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and are trying to thwart the Trump administration’s efforts to build a border barrier that could cut across the company’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico coast near Brownsville.

Lawmakers said they’re concerned about the impact on the company’s 50-acre facility after seeing a Department of Homeland Security map showing a barrier running through what they describe as a launchpad.

Can we just not?  I'm sure it would take all of 2.37 seconds to change the proposed path once it was pointed out SpaceX needed the land.
You're sure? DHS has not been super willing to change the path for other businesses and private private owners along the border. Bending for SpaceX without an exceptional reason would open them up to numerous legal challenges, on top those they're already dealing with. If this were a case of "oh, sure, we'll move it sorry to bother you" I doubt we'd be seeing a second round of these articles after the first in December.

SpaceX is a bit more vital to the country than Joe's Burger Shack, etc.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.