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Author Topic: SpaceX (general discussion)  (Read 203134 times)

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1275 on: October 26, 2018, 01:02:35 pm »
Viasat confirms SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy will launch next-gen broadband satellite

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Viasat announced Thursday that a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket will launch a next-generation broadband satellite from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center some time between 2020 and 2022, joining Arianespace and United Launch Alliance in a three-way split for Viasat’s new launch contracts.

The fresh launch deal is the second commercial Falcon Heavy launch contract signed by SpaceX in recent weeks. The Swedish company Ovzon announced Oct. 16 its selection of a Falcon Heavy rocket to haul its first geostationary communications satellite to orbit from Florida’s Space Coast as soon as the fourth quarter of 2020.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1276 on: October 31, 2018, 01:22:29 am »
Musk shakes up SpaceX in race to make satellite launch window: sources

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-spacex-starlink-insight/musk-shakes-up-spacex-in-race-to-make-satellite-launch-window-sources-idUSKCN1N50FC

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Musk had fired at least seven members of the program’s senior management team at the Redmond, Washington, office, the culmination of disagreements over the pace at which the team was developing and testing its Starlink satellites, according to the two SpaceX employees with direct knowledge of the situation.
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SpaceX employees told Reuters that two Starlink test satellites launched in February, dubbed Tintin A and B, were functioning as intended.
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SpaceX has said it would launch its satellites in phases through 2024. It goal of having Internet service available in 2020 is “pretty much on target” with an initial satellite launch by mid-2019, one of the sources said.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1277 on: November 07, 2018, 11:59:19 am »
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Mod to SpaceX tech tree build: Falcon 9 second stage will be upgraded to be like a mini-BFR Ship

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1060253333116473344

Twitter thread says first flight in June.

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Won’t land propulsively for those reasons. Ultra light heat shield & high Mach control surfaces are what we can’t test well without orbital entry. I think we have a handle on propulsive landings.

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1060265065276825601

Looks like it's to be a tech demonstrator.

More here.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-miniature-bfr-spaceship-falcon-9-launch-elon-musk/
« Last Edit: November 07, 2018, 01:38:45 pm by Flyaway »

Offline seruriermarshal

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1278 on: November 07, 2018, 08:35:35 pm »


Twitter thread says first flight in June.



2019 ?

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1279 on: November 08, 2018, 09:01:17 am »

Offline Michel Van

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1280 on: November 08, 2018, 01:43:10 pm »
I guess they modified the Second stage with Lightweight heat shield and control surface for BFR testing.
After LEO missions that Second stage will make those test during it's deorbit .
Also on some GTO missions were second Stage will have high reentry speeds testing the heat shield

on long therm that could become Concept for Second stage reuse
maybe replace second stage by a Mini BFR 
I love Strange Technology

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1281 on: November 09, 2018, 01:37:20 am »
SpaceX press release:

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NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP) has certified Falcon 9 as a Category 3 launch vehicle. Category 3 launch vehicles are certified to support NASA’s highest cost and most complex scientific missions. The following statement is from SpaceX President and Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Shotwell:

“LSP Category 3 certification is a major achievement for the Falcon 9 team and represents another key milestone in our close partnership with NASA. We are honored to have the opportunity to provide cost-effective and reliable launch services to the country’s most critical scientific payloads."

The process of designating launch vehicles as Category 3 is designed to assure the highest practicable probability of success. Falcon 9 has completed over 60 missions, including the NASA LSP missions Jason-3 and TESS.

Additional certification is still required for it to be certified to carry payloads with RTGs.

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1282 on: November 09, 2018, 07:13:08 am »
SpaceX press release:

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__
NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP) has certified Falcon 9 as a Category 3 launch vehicle. Category 3 launch vehicles are certified to support NASA’s highest cost and most complex scientific missions. The following statement is from SpaceX President and Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Shotwell:

“LSP Category 3 certification is a major achievement for the Falcon 9 team and represents another key milestone in our close partnership with NASA. We are honored to have the opportunity to provide cost-effective and reliable launch services to the country’s most critical scientific payloads."

The process of designating launch vehicles as Category 3 is designed to assure the highest practicable probability of success. Falcon 9 has completed over 60 missions, including the NASA LSP missions Jason-3 and TESS.

Additional certification is still required for it to be certified to carry payloads with RTGs.

Category 4?
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Offline TomS

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1283 on: November 09, 2018, 07:36:41 am »
SpaceX press release:

Quote
__
NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP) has certified Falcon 9 as a Category 3 launch vehicle. Category 3 launch vehicles are certified to support NASA’s highest cost and most complex scientific missions. The following statement is from SpaceX President and Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Shotwell:

“LSP Category 3 certification is a major achievement for the Falcon 9 team and represents another key milestone in our close partnership with NASA. We are honored to have the opportunity to provide cost-effective and reliable launch services to the country’s most critical scientific payloads."

The process of designating launch vehicles as Category 3 is designed to assure the highest practicable probability of success. Falcon 9 has completed over 60 missions, including the NASA LSP missions Jason-3 and TESS.

Additional certification is still required for it to be certified to carry payloads with RTGs.

Category 4?

No, Category 3 plus some additional certification of destruct systems (to make sure the RTG housings will survive a destruct event intact).  Same way human-rating requires CAT 3 plus some other criteria for crew escape/survival.




Offline Grey Havoc

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Offline TomcatViP

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1285 on: November 10, 2018, 06:48:42 am »
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Between distant places, this will allow messages to be sent about twice as fast as through the optical fibres on Earth that currently connect the internet, despite having to travel to space and back. This is because the speed of the signal in glass is slower than it is through space.
in all exactitude
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The speed of light in a vacuum is 299,792,458 meters per second, or 186,282 miles per second. In any other medium, though, it's generally a lot slower. In normal optical fibers (silica glass), light travels a full 31% slower
(sourced from ggl)

But more importantly is the fact that networks are heavily branched and all that signals relay impacts the overall speed. Starlink could hence be seen as the highway of data. 
« Last Edit: November 10, 2018, 06:51:27 am by TomcatViP »

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1286 on: November 10, 2018, 07:09:05 am »
Quote
Between distant places, this will allow messages to be sent about twice as fast as through the optical fibres on Earth that currently connect the internet, despite having to travel to space and back. This is because the speed of the signal in glass is slower than it is through space.
in all exactitude
Quote
The speed of light in a vacuum is 299,792,458 meters per second, or 186,282 miles per second. In any other medium, though, it's generally a lot slower. In normal optical fibers (silica glass), light travels a full 31% slower
(sourced from ggl)

But more importantly is the fact that networks are heavily branched and all that signals relay impacts the overall speed. Starlink could hence be seen as the highway of data.

Wonder how difficult it would be to have a solar-powered "cloud" server up there as well.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1287 on: November 10, 2018, 07:28:09 am »
You really don't want to be using cloud server architecture for mission critical applications.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2018, 07:30:50 am by Grey Havoc »
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Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1288 on: November 10, 2018, 05:02:35 pm »
You really don't want to be using cloud server architecture for mission critical applications.

I meant for the average Joe Blow who might be using the network.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline sienar

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1289 on: November 11, 2018, 12:04:02 pm »
Given the failure rate of HDs in database applications it'd be a good way to make a very heavy piece of space junk in only a few years.