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Author Topic: SpaceX (general discussion)  (Read 173424 times)

Offline Michel Van

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1080 on: March 14, 2018, 10:39:26 am »
My SWAG would be "before 2025 but not much".

edit:  I'm wondering how much trouble they'll have with the heat shield.  The upper stage is far larger than the Shuttle Orbiter and it has to deal with higher reentry speeds.  (Coming back from the moon - something like 25k mph- and from Mars.)

Here is SpaceX again innovative:
they took NASA "Phenolic impregnated carbon ablator" short PICA and improved it to PICA-X
standard lightweight PICA withstand 12.4 km/s (28,000 mph) at 135 km altitude with Stardust sample-return capsule

While PICA-X ver 1 & 2 were innovative in more easier production and  lower cost on Dragon 1 & 2
now work SpaceX on PICA-X version 3, improves upon its heat shielding capacity, guess what for BFR !

Dan Rasky: about SpaceX's Rapid Prototyping Design Process in 2016.




Source Wiki
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_entry#PICA-X
I love Strange Technology

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1081 on: March 15, 2018, 10:48:49 am »
SpaceX wins lucrative new contracts to fly GPS and earth-imaging satellites

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The US Air Force has announced a deal with SpaceX, Elon Musk’s rocket company, to fly three of the newest generation of Global Positioning System satellites into space, at an average cost of $97 million per flight. The service also contracted with United Launch Alliance, a joint venture of Boeing and Lockheed Martin, for two launches carrying space-surveillance satellites and some experimental hardware, at an average cost of $177 million per flight.

Quote
Yet in the commercial world, price is king: SpaceX also announced a deal with DigitalGlobe, a satellite imaging company, to launch two new satellites in 2020, on previously-flown Falcon 9 rockets. While those prices were not disclosed, Musk has said previously that flying on a reused rocket could come with a 30% discount. SpaceX is the only company operating reusable boosters, and has flown six missions using them.

https://qz.com/1229463/elon-musks-spacex-wins-lucrative-new-contracts-to-fly-gps-and-earth-imaging-satellites-for-the-us-air-force/


Offline Tuna

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1082 on: March 20, 2018, 10:31:57 am »

Interesting video fredymac, it is a wonder why SpaceX are even bothering with the Block 5 Falcon 9 rocket when they said that all future production of the Falcon 9 would be stopped and all future production would be concentrated on the BFR?  ???  :-\

No, SpaceX said all future development will be stopped. They have at least 50 launches on the manifest for the next 4 years, and can't just postpone those indefinitely until BFR is operational.

Watched that video earlier today and if I remember correctly they said the block 5 is the design freeze point for Falcon 9 and after seven successful launches of the block 5 standard it can be classed as human spaceflight/astronaut rated.

Design and engineering efforts switch to BFR while block 5 is in production I believe.

I would like to point out that the developement freeze is imposed on SpaceX by NASA. SpaceX likes incremental development, making small changes to almost every successive rocket, tweaking it to get a little bit more performance every launch, as opposed to making the design what they want from the beginning and sticking with it. NASA is pretty adamantly opposed to this, because they feel that each change in the rocket introduces the possibility of a previously unknown safety issue. To be fair, they have a point -- the loss of AMOS-6 was a textbook example of such an occurrence. SpaceX had introduced densified propellant, oxidizer and even densified helium pressurization fluid, to fit more into the same tanks and to push more through with the same pumps. The densified helium caused some of the oxidizer to freeze solid, which eventually caused the loss of the vehicle and it's payload. However, at the same time it was tweaks like densification that allowed Falcon 9 to reach the kind of performance that makes reusability viable at a low cost.

But anyway, one of the criteria NASA has set for commercial operators to human-rate their rockets is to launch exactly the same design, with no changes *at all* for a given number of times, IIRC 9. SpaceX has chosen "Block 5" to be this point where the development of Falcon 9 ends. Now, of course, all their development engineers had no more work to do on the F9, so it of course makes sense for them to start working on the next big thing.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1083 on: March 25, 2018, 12:56:31 pm »
Round up of the Falcon 9 fleet and the introduction of the Block 5.

SpaceX Falcon 9 Block 5 will usher in a new era of rapid reuse rockets

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Despite all missions being readily in the range of recovery, SpaceX has only attempted to recover its Falcon boosters after two of the company’s five 2018 launches. If anything, the attachment to Falcon boosters and the apparent melancholy felt by many observers when they are not recovered is a testament to the staggeringly abrupt success of SpaceX’s reusable rocketry program.

Aside from Falcon Heavy’s center core and 1044, each booster expended in the last several months (Iridium-4, GovSat-1, and PAZ) was aging, flight-proven, and nearing the end of its operational life: Block 3 and Block 4 Falcon 9s were simply not designed or expected to fly more than two or three times total. Their seemingly premature deaths were thus a necessary step along the path to Block 5 and truly rapid and cheap booster reuse; perhaps as pragmatic as quite literally making space for new and superior hardware at SpaceX’s many facilities. The demise of Falcon Heavy’s center core nevertheless made for a spectacular video (skip to 1:10, or watch the whole thing…).

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-falcon-9-block-5-rapid-reuse-rockets/

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1084 on: March 25, 2018, 02:24:16 pm »
The notion that SpaceX will be testing BFR next year would seem to be to be a bit premature.  Looks like they've just bought the property the building it will be built in will be built on.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacexs-first-bfr-manufacturing-facility-approved-long-beach-port-la-photos/

(Unless the BFR test vehicles are being built somewhere else that is.)
« Last Edit: March 26, 2018, 12:03:05 pm by sferrin »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline Moose

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1085 on: March 25, 2018, 05:27:37 pm »
The notion that SpaceX will be testing BFR would seem to be to be a bit premature.  Looks like they've just bought the property the building it will be built in will be built on.

https://www.teslarati.com/spacexs-first-bfr-manufacturing-facility-approved-long-beach-port-la-photos/

(Unless the BFR test vehicles are being built somewhere else that is.)
NSF membershio believes test ship will be assembled either in Florida or Texas from components built in existing facilities.

Offline NeilChapman

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1086 on: March 26, 2018, 02:52:37 am »

Perhaps there will be two facilities?  One for testing, one for production work?

Offline Hobbes

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1087 on: March 26, 2018, 03:19:34 am »
Yes. Production has already started in existing facilities, but for the production volume SpaceX envisions a new factory is necessary (and has to be close to water to make transport easier), that's what the Long Beach location is for.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1088 on: March 26, 2018, 05:35:40 am »
I assume they think BFR will be easier to do, backed up some comments by Mr Musk hence why it’s being left for now?

Offline Hobbes

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1089 on: March 26, 2018, 08:03:02 am »
No, they didn't start earlier because all available engineering resources were focused on Falcon 9/FH.

BFR breaks new ground (all-carbon structure, new advanced engine) so will take more engineering than F9.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1090 on: March 26, 2018, 01:23:23 pm »
Elon Musk: Making Life Multi-Planetary
By Leonard David
March 26th, 2018

Elon Musk, CEO and Lead Designer at SpaceX, presents the updated design for the Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), in a summary article published in New Space, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

The article is available free on the New Space website.

The article is a summary of Musk’s presentation at the 68th International Astronautical Congress.

http://www.leonarddavid.com/elon-musk-making-life-multi-planetary/

Here’s the article:

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/space.2018.29013.emu

Offline fredymac

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1091 on: March 30, 2018, 12:33:58 pm »
Fairing recovery attempt failed during today's Iridium launch.  Sounds like unexpected aerodynamics fouled the parafoil.


From Musk Twitter:
"GPS guided parafoil twisted, so fairing impacted water at high speed. Air wake from fairing messing w parafoil steering. Doing helo drop tests in next few weeks to solve."


This is the kind of basic R&D that ULA should be doing if they were serious about recovering the engines from their Vulcan launcher.

Offline TomcatViP

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1092 on: April 01, 2018, 12:58:38 pm »
seems it did not fail afterall (this is April fool day  ::) ;D)

SpaceX returns intact fairing half
« Last Edit: April 01, 2018, 01:12:25 pm by TomcatViP »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1093 on: April 02, 2018, 09:46:51 am »
SpaceX to Debut Falcon 9 Block 5 in April

CAPE CANAVERAL - The upgraded Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket SpaceX needs to taxi NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and deliver U.S. national security spacecraft into orbit will make its first flight on a commercial mission for Bangladesh, SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell says. Bangabandhu Satellite-1, which was built by Thales Alenia Space for the Bangladesh Telecommunication Regulatory Commission, will be the first Bangladeshi geostationary satellite, ...

http://m.aviationweek.com/space/spacex-debut-falcon-9-block-5-april

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX (general discussion)
« Reply #1094 on: April 02, 2018, 10:01:10 am »
seems it did not fail afterall (this is April fool day  ::) ;D)

SpaceX returns intact fairing half

Well there are two halves.  One obviously failed, so it wasn't necessarily an April Fool's prank.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.