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Author Topic: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)  (Read 100958 times)

Offline Flyaway

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #360 on: March 13, 2019, 03:45:15 pm »
Facing more delays, NASA opens door to launching lunar mission with commercial rockets

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In a major shift, NASA is considering using two commercial launchers to send an unpiloted Orion crew capsule and its European-built service module on a test flight around the moon next year, maintaining the lunar test flight’s schedule despite fresh delays in the development of the multibillion-dollar Space Launch System that jeopardize the heavy-lifter’s 2020 inaugural flight, the agency’s administrator said in a congressional hearing Wednesday.

And from the other side.

COALITION FOR DEEP SPACE EXPLORATION STATEMENT FOLLOWING SENATE COMMERCE HEARING WITH THE NASA ADMINISTRATOR
 
This morning at a hearing of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, NASA Administrator Bridenstine mentioned that NASA is investigating an alternate approach to flying an Orion crew vehicle and European Service Module (SM) to the Moon by June of 2020. This approach would continue the development of the Space Launch System (SLS), enabling a full testing regime for this critical national asset, and bring SLS and Orion together for the following mission.
 
No launch vehicle other than the SLS can enable the launch of a fully-outfitted Orion, including the SM, to the Moon. As a result, the Administrator noted that this approach would require at least two launches of heavy-lift vehicles.  It could also include in-orbit assembly of a launch vehicle with an upper stage, which would then be used to direct Orion and the SM to the Moon. The analysis to determine whether this approach is feasible is still ongoing. The integration challenges are significant. It is also clear that this approach would require additional funding, since the idea is to undertake both this mission and to continue development of the SLS apace.
 
The assessment of options such as these are the hallmark of both NASA and the aerospace industry that supports it. Distributed across all 50 states in civil, commercial and military space, the aerospace and defense industry is crucial to U.S. competitiveness across the globe and to American leadership in science, security, entrepreneurship and human exploration of space. The Coalition for Deep Space Exploration and its member companies strongly support forward-leaning efforts to speed human return to the Moon. We welcome the opportunity to join NASA in the flights of Orion, SLS and the Exploration Ground Systems that support these journeys, and the rapid expansion of science, commerce and human exploration at the Moon and beyond.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2019, 04:16:18 pm by Flyaway »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #361 on: March 14, 2019, 11:49:02 am »
https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/status/1106216251939057667

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Have seen lots of questions about whether United Launch Alliance can build one or two Delta IV Heavy rockets in 15 months for a commercially launched Orion. Behind the scenes, I understand they have told NASA they can.

Here’s why NASA’s administrator made such a bold move Wednesday

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In a remarkable turnaround, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on Wednesday said the space agency would consider launching its first Orion mission to the Moon on commercial rockets instead of NASA's own Space Launch System. This caught virtually the entire aerospace world off guard, and represents a bold change from the status quo of Orion as America's spacecraft, and the SLS as America's powerful rocket that will launch it.

The announcement raised a bunch of questions, and we've got some speculative but well-informed answers.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 12:15:27 pm by Flyaway »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #362 on: March 14, 2019, 02:45:14 pm »
Can Orion Fly To The Moon Without SLS?


Offline carmelo

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #363 on: March 14, 2019, 04:03:59 pm »
Can ?

Offline Flyaway

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #364 on: March 15, 2019, 01:30:45 am »
Further clarification about EM-1 flying on commercial launchers from Bridenstine:

https://spacenews.com/bridenstine-reiterates-commitment-to-sls/

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Speaking at a Space Transportation Association luncheon here March 14, Bridenstine said the ongoing study to use commercial launch vehicles rather than the SLS for Exploration Mission (EM) 1 was motivated by a desire to maintain a schedule that called for flying the mission in mid 2020, and that it was a stopgap measure only.

“This is a fix to a problem,” he told an audience of aerospace executives, congressional staffers and representatives of other space agencies of that potential alternative approach to EM-1. “This is not the solution. This is not sustainable.”

Offline Michel Van

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #365 on: March 18, 2019, 01:27:42 am »
in princip is feasible

Orion is launch with Falcon Heavy into Low earth orbit
Delta Heavy upper stage is launch with Delta v heavy

The Delta upper stage is equip with docking system and gyroscope to stabilize it in orbit.
The Orion do the active part of remote Docking while the Delta the passive part

even manned flight would possible if Orion "parked" at ISS and astronauts get on board.
this crew is brought by a Starliner or Crew Dragon to ISS
afterwards then dock with Delta upper stage and goes around the moon
I love Strange Technology

Offline Dilandu

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #366 on: March 18, 2019, 09:01:13 am »
in princip is feasible

Orion is launch with Falcon Heavy into Low earth orbit
Delta Heavy upper stage is launch with Delta v heavy

Hm. The mass of Orion is about 25 tons.  It would took about 4 km/s of delta-V to reach the Lunar orbit or Lagrange points of Earth-Moon system, and about 1,3 km/s to return to Earth (using aerobraking). So, about 6 km/s of total delta-V should be brought.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #367 on: March 19, 2019, 01:33:13 pm »
FEATURE ARTICLE: Administration proposes the end of EUS while Administrator considers full Exploration manifest rewrite -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/03/administration-proposes-end-eus-exploration-manifest-rewrite/

Offline sferrin

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Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #368 on: March 19, 2019, 01:51:12 pm »
As in all things, surely if we cancel it it will lead to the inevitable follow-on program delivering sooner and cheaper than if we'd continued with the existing program.   For a while anyway it almost looked like we'd escaped the stupidity of the past 20 years.  Between this and the USN that soundly puts that notion to rest.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.