Register here

Author Topic: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)  (Read 93116 times)

Offline Michel Van

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 4055
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #330 on: May 29, 2018, 08:33:34 am »
According Anatoly Zak
has NASA revise the Gateway station launch sequence
this time four SLS launches and three Commercial launches...

I love Strange Technology

Online Moose

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 874
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #331 on: May 29, 2018, 09:37:52 am »
That version has a second Hab and 2 airlocks, is this a new baseline or an expanded-capabilities study?

Offline carmelo

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 212
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #332 on: May 29, 2018, 09:46:08 am »
All this stuff is funded?

Offline Flyaway

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1534
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #333 on: July 10, 2018, 01:17:32 pm »
NASA adding more SLS Block 1 launches to manifest

Quote
With two more launches of the Block 1 version of the Space Launch System now planned, NASA is starting work to procure and human-rate additional upper stages.

NASA originally expected to fly the Block 1 version of the SLS only once before moving to the more powerful Block 1B version of the rocket. The Block 1 uses an upper stage known as the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), based on the Delta 4 upper stage. The Block 1B will replace the ICPS with the Exploration Upper Stage, a larger upper stage under development.

However, with funding from Congress provided in the fiscal year 2018 omnibus appropriations bill to build a second mobile launch platform, NASA now expects to use the Block 1 version more than once. Those additional launches can take place using the existing mobile launch platform while the new one, designed for Block 1B, is built. That move is designed to reduce concerns about a long gap between SLS missions had NASA gone through with original plans to modify the mobile launch platform after the first SLS mission so it could be used for the Block 1B.

http://spacenews.com/nasa-adding-more-sls-block-1-launches-to-manifest/

Offline Grey Havoc

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 7962
  • The path not taken.
The sole imperative of a government, once instituted, is to survive.

Offline Flyaway

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1534
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #335 on: July 25, 2018, 01:41:43 pm »
RS-25 Engine Installed On Stennis Space Center Stand For New Test Series

Aerojet Rocketdyne developmental RS-25 engine No. 0525 is readied for installation on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on July 23 in preparation for another new hotfire series to support NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) Program. Stennis is testing all RS-25 engines that will help power the SLS rocket, which is being built for missions beyond low-Earth orbit, carrying crew and cargo to the Moon and beyond. Four RS-25 engines, working in conjunction with a pair of solid rocket boosters, will power the SLS rocket at launch. The initial RS-25 engines are former space shuttle main engines, modified to provide the additional thrust needed for the larger, heavier SLS rocket.

Originally designed more than 40 years ago to provide a specific power level categorized as 100 percent thrust, the RS-25 version of the space shuttle main engine has been upgraded to operate at 111 percent of its original power. NASA has been testing RS-25 modifications and flight engines at Stennis since January 2015 in preparation for the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) and Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2) flights of SLS. EM-1 will test the capabilities of the new rocket and will carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft into space beyond the moon. EM-2 will be the first flight to carry humans aboard the Orion spacecraft, returning astronauts to deep space for the first time in more than 40 years.

The next series of tests at Stennis is scheduled to begin mid-August. For the test, a new flight controller component will be installed on the RS-25 developmental engine and fired just as during an actual launch. The new flight controller is a major part of the RS-25 modifications, operating as the “brain” of the engine to help it communicate with the SLS rocket and to provide precision control of engine operation and internal health diagnostics. A total of 10 hot fires are scheduled for the test series, seven by the end of 2018 and three in the early part of 2019. Each will feature a flight controller that will be used on an actual SLS mission.

Each RS-25 test moves the agency closer and closer to its return to deep space exploration, to such destinations as the Moon and Mars. In addition to testing RS-25 engines and components for SLS flights, Stennis is preparing to test the actual core stage that will be used on the EM-1 mission. NASA has been modifying the B-2 Test Stand at Stennis for the core stage testing. The testing will involve installing the flight stage on the B-2 Test Stand and firing all four of its RS-25 engines simultaneously, as during a launch.

RS-25 tests at Stennis are conducted by a team of NASA, Aerojet Rocketdyne and Syncom Space Services engineers and operators. Aerojet Rocketdyne is the RS-25 prime contractor. Syncom Space Services is the prime contractor for Stennis facilities and operations.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/rs-25-engine-installed-on-stennis-space-center-stand-for-new-test-series

Offline FighterJock

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 867
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #336 on: July 28, 2018, 07:51:02 am »
The mobile launcher for the SLS will be set for a test roll out to pad 39B in August.  This is from NASA Spaceflight.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/06/sls-ml-test-rollout-39b-august/

Offline Flyaway

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1534
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #337 on: September 17, 2018, 04:15:09 am »
Could November elections scramble a controversial U.S. mission to a frozen moon?

Quote
Earlier this year, planetary scientists got a pleasant surprise: a big boost in NASA’s budget, instituted at the direction of Representative John Culberson (R–TX), a leading member of the House of Representatives spending panel. But some of that money—$195 million, to be exact—came with a catch. It had to be spent on a robotic mission to land on Europa, Jupiter’s frozen moon, to search for signs of life.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/09/could-november-elections-scramble-controversial-us-mission-frozen-moon

Offline Flyaway

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1534
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #338 on: October 10, 2018, 11:48:32 pm »
NASA inspector general sharply criticizes SLS core stage development

Quote
The report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that Boeing had done a poor job managing development of the core stage of the SLS while NASA did insufficient oversight of that contract, resulting in a doubling of the program’s costs and delays of several years.

“We found Boeing’s poor performance is the main reason for the significant cost increases and schedule delays to developing the SLS Core Stage,” the OIG report stated. “Specifically, the Project’s cost and schedule issues stem primarily from management, technical, and infrastructure issues directly related to Boeing’s performance.”

Online Moose

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 874
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #339 on: October 11, 2018, 04:16:13 pm »
NASA inspector general sharply criticizes SLS core stage development

Quote
The report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that Boeing had done a poor job managing development of the core stage of the SLS while NASA did insufficient oversight of that contract, resulting in a doubling of the program’s costs and delays of several years.

“We found Boeing’s poor performance is the main reason for the significant cost increases and schedule delays to developing the SLS Core Stage,” the OIG report stated. “Specifically, the Project’s cost and schedule issues stem primarily from management, technical, and infrastructure issues directly related to Boeing’s performance.”
This is one of those places where the near-complete abdication of its oversight role by the recent/present Congress really tells.

Offline Flyaway

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 1534
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 03:22:30 am by Flyaway »

Offline Michel Van

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 4055
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #341 on: November 20, 2018, 04:13:38 am »
NASA 'will eventually' retire its new mega-rocket if SpaceX, Blue Origin can safely launch their own powerful rockets


why, i not surprised by that News ?

It make sense, since SpaceX and Blue Origin and others working on Big Boosters. Faster, better, cheaper as NASA SLS,
what is obsolete, expensive, far behind schedule and Budget and fighting for meaning to be
let's take Lunar Gateway original it's launch exclusive by SLS, now it's down to Manned Flights, while SpaceX, Blue Origin, ULA do unmanned launches...

I always made Jokes that NASA astronauts will end up as front-seat passenger on spacecraft of SpaceX of Blue Origin on way to Moon and Mars
now it become a realty
I love Strange Technology

Offline sferrin

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 10943
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline FighterJock

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 867
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #343 on: November 20, 2018, 05:34:45 am »
NASA 'will eventually' retire its new mega-rocket if SpaceX, Blue Origin can safely launch their own powerful rockets

Would not be at all surprised if NASA "retired" it before it even flew once.

What would the cost penalties be if NASA retired the SLS early?  After spending billions of dollars on research. 

Offline Byeman

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 718
Re: NASA Space Launch System (SLS)
« Reply #344 on: November 20, 2018, 06:12:34 am »
NASA 'will eventually' retire its new mega-rocket if SpaceX, Blue Origin can safely launch their own powerful rockets

Would not be at all surprised if NASA "retired" it before it even flew once.

What would the cost penalties be if NASA retired the SLS early?  After spending billions of dollars on research.

None.  Sunk costs don't matter.