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Author Topic: SpaceX Heavy  (Read 22630 times)

Offline Michel Van

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Offline flanker

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2015, 01:33:03 pm »
http://nextbigfuture.com/2015/10/within-80-days-elon-musk-should-reveal.html


he... he.. goes for NOVA SIZE rocket ?!

This is news? They want to have 100 tonnes of useful payload to Mars, so it needs to be larger than Nova. And Gwynne said BFR/MCT will have 3-4 times the thrust of FH;

https://youtu.be/QHLrfNDCzgk?t=10m55s

Which is between 14 and 18 million lbf. (61-82000kN), 1.8-2.4 times larger than Saturn V. It is speculated "236" is the magic number for its LEO performance.
Push the envelope,watch it bend.

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2015, 01:40:02 pm »
http://nextbigfuture.com/2015/10/within-80-days-elon-musk-should-reveal.html


he... he.. goes for NOVA SIZE rocket ?!

This is news? They want to have 100 tonnes of useful payload to Mars, so it needs to be larger than Nova. And Gwynne said BFR/MCT will have 3-4 times the thrust of FH;

https://youtu.be/QHLrfNDCzgk?t=10m55s

Which is between 14 and 18 million lbf. (61-82000kN), 1.8-2.4 times larger than Saturn V. It is speculated "236" is the magic number for its LEO performance.

The Nova series went significantly higher than that.  And 1,000,000lbs to LEO.   :o
« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 01:43:29 pm by sferrin »
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Offline flanker

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2015, 02:01:15 pm »
Meh, i too can draw napkin drawings of some rockets with random numbers. The actual, semi real, Nova had 8 F-1's.
Push the envelope,watch it bend.

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2015, 03:09:24 pm »
Meh, i too can draw napkin drawings of some rockets with random numbers. The actual, semi real, Nova had 8 F-1's.

Ah, now I see the source of your confusion.  You're thinking of the old one intended to go to the moon (which those I posted clearly are not).  Nova was suppose to go to Mars post Apollo.  There were many designs looked at and they were "real" enough that the M-1 was uprated to fly on them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-1_%28rocket_engine%29

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Offline blackstar

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2015, 03:38:33 pm »
Meh, i too can draw napkin drawings of some rockets with random numbers. The actual, semi real, Nova had 8 F-1's.

You take that back!

Elon is the new Messiah!

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2015, 04:13:30 pm »
Meh, i too can draw napkin drawings of some rockets with random numbers. The actual, semi real, Nova had 8 F-1's.

You take that back!

Elon is the new Messiah!

He wasn't talking about Elon.  He was trying to dismiss subsequent Nova efforts.
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline flanker

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2015, 04:34:28 pm »
Yeah, i was thinking of the Moon Nova. I have actually never heard/seen about M-1 before, sorry for ignorance here.  :-X

And besides, Elon is not the new Messiah. He is Our Lord and Savior you heathen.

Praise be, praise be.

On topic, SpaceX updated the renders on their site of FH not too long ago, now showing the real version with with all the Falcon 9 v1.1FT related changes: http://www.spacex.com/falcon-heavy
« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 04:39:53 pm by flanker »
Push the envelope,watch it bend.

Offline antiquark

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2015, 07:48:22 pm »
Another contemporary Nova illustration. Look at the size of that thing!


Offline Hobbes

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2015, 02:46:02 am »
In the images attached to Sferrin's post there are two Nova configurations that look like they borrowed an N-1 first stage  ;D

Offline sferrin

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2015, 04:57:18 am »
In the images attached to Sferrin's post there are two Nova configurations that look like they borrowed an N-1 first stage  ;D

Yes, anything conical clearly ripped off the N-1s design.  ::)
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Offline George Allegrezza

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #41 on: October 15, 2015, 08:16:49 am »
After the selection of LOR as the moon-landing mode, MSFC re-oriented the Nova project to larger launchers of about a million pounds payload to LEO, for Mars missions and lunar base development, and renamed the effort Post-Saturn.  MM and General Dynamics were the contractors for the main effort, with Douglas and Boeing having a secondary role.

Class I types were extrapolations of Saturn -- two stages with F-1A and M-1 propulsion, or solid first stages with M-1 upper stages.

Class II introduced recoverable stages and an greater variety of propulsion options, such as plug nozzles and high-pressure hydrogen engines.

Class III was primarily comprised of single-stage designs, fully recoverable, with more advanced propulsion such as air augmentation (as showin in the Renova/R10R-2 option in the "MM Advanced Designs" pic).  The conical Martin jobs were the S10 single stage versions, S10E (expendable) and S10R (recoverable).

Class IV was very advanced, often with integrated chemical and nuclear propulsion (such as GD's Nexus).

Boeing continued to develop the solid-boosted Nova concept after the end of the post-Saturn project, first showing a single-stage hydrogen vehicle with massive solid boosters in 1965, and refining that concept into AMLLV in 1967-68, with a range of solid and liquid boosters coupled to a hydrogen core.

Douglas developed OOST and ROOST single stage boosters, which eventually led to ROMBUS and ICARUS.

The basic elements of the Class I post-Saturn systems briefly re-appeared in the SEI era, with Lockheed's review of the "Case 4" in-line tandem-staged launchers with re-born F-1A or M-1 propulsion.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2015, 08:18:24 am by George Allegrezza »



Offline Grey Havoc

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