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Author Topic: Nike Zeus and Derivatives  (Read 18906 times)

Offline Pem Tech

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2010, 04:48:36 am »
Great images and information guys!
We have a small hobby business and just may have to model one or more of these beauties.

 ;D
Layne Pemberton
Mad Scientist, Minion and Owner
Pemberton Technologies
http://www.pembertontechnologies.com
pem_tech@yahoo.com

Offline sferrin

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2010, 03:20:50 pm »
Not a Zeus A specific video but it does have a nice color clip of a Nike Zeus A (and Zeus B ) launch.  Unfortunately it's in slow motion so you really can't get a good feel for it's speed (at 11,000lbs and 450,000lbs thrust liftoff it must have been QUICK).  Also some good launches of Nike Hercules, but again, most are in slow motion with only one showing it's true speed.  Makes Patriot look slow.  Also Sergent, Hawk, Lacross, Honest John, Little John, and others.  Oh, and a Nike Hercules Corporal kill and an Honest John kill by Hawk.  

« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 03:23:56 pm by sferrin »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2011, 09:58:01 am »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline sferrin

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"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2013, 03:04:46 pm »
If anyone has some really good quality photo's it would be great to post them, as all I've ever seen are really grainey, fuzzy, retouched jobs.
Here's a PDF from a WSMR history publication and some images from within that publication.

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2013, 03:49:20 pm »
Request:
Could we move this over to the "Missile Projects" Forum and get it renamed to "Nike Zeus and Derivatives"?

Anyway, here's a link to some images I scanned in of Nike ZEUS at Archives II's photographic floor. I could probably get more and better images at a later visit, but hey...

NOTE: You can download the original images by clicking on ACTIONS: VIEW ALL SIZES and "ORIGINAL"

111-SC-573460 - Donald Douglas Jr and NIKE ZEUS by RyanCrierie, on Flickr


111-SC-577846 - Nike Zeus at WSMR - 1960 by RyanCrierie, on Flickr


111-SC-578528 - Nike Zeus launch at WSMR - 4 Sep 1960 by RyanCrierie, on Flickr


111-SC-578560 - Static test of new Nike Zeus ZW-9 Configuration at WSMR - 10 Aug 1960 by RyanCrierie, on Flickr


111-SC-578569 - Nike Zeus ZW-12 launch at WSMR - 1 Dec 1960 by RyanCrierie, on Flickr


Nike Zeus Test Radar by RyanCrierie, on Flickr
 
 
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 03:53:36 pm by RyanCrierie »

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2013, 10:40:53 pm »
Hands Across History, November 2006 (Volume II, Letter IV)

has this handy guide and photo comparison:

Nike-Zeus A: "Winged" Configuration. - Resembled a supersized Nike-Herc, and sometimes mis-IDed as a Nike Herc. First fired in August 1959.

Nike-Zeus B: "Canard" Configuration. First fired in August 1960.

Army Launch Area 5 (ALA-5) was built for Nike-Zeus; and it was later redesignated Launch Complex (LC) 38 at WSMR.

It consisted of two R&D launch cells, one tactical launch cell, and five radar buildings. Missile Assembly Building Sixteen (MAB-16) was where most of the Zeus assembly/checkout was done.

When JFK visited WSMR on 5 June 1963, they actually launched a Nike Zeus B for him as a firepower demo.  ::)

In another issue of Hands Across History (November 2010), they talked about the briefing JFK got, and included a handwritten non-classified briefing paper scan which gives the maximum miss distance that a Nike ZEUS (B?) can miss and still kill an ICBM RV -- 800' feet.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2013, 10:46:54 pm by RyanCrierie »

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2013, 11:01:20 pm »
THE EAGLE
24 January 2013
 
Kwaj radar achieves 'first'
Sharon Watkins Lang
SMDC Command Historian
 
[photo of it next to sea]
The ZEUS Acquisition Radar receiver was housed atop an eight-story building. The receiver revolved “on the world’s largest precision ball bearing – 1.35 feet in diameter.”
 
[photo of components inside]
Installation of the ZEUS Acquisition Radar receiver signal processing group in November 1961.
 
The U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll ZEUS Acquisition Radar received its first signal returns from an Intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM on Jan. 24, 1962. This was the initial test of the ZAR against a real target.
 
The ZAR was one of four radars in the NIKE-ZEUS anti-ballistic missile system constructed on Kwajalein. It worked in concert with a discrimination radar, two target track radars, three missile track radars, battery control equipment, a target interceptor computer, and four ZEUS launch cells. The ZAR was a track-while-scan radar that would scan the heavens to locate potential targets approaching the protected area. The data was transmitted to the discrimination radar, which would analyze the possible threats and select the targets from the decoys. This information was then forwarded to the target track radars. In an era with few onboard guidance systems, the missile track radars would guide the interceptor.
 
The largest single construction project of the early 1960s, the ZAR complex consisted of a transmitter, a receiver and a power plant. The ZAR Transmitter consisted of three antenna arrays in a horizontal triangular arrangement. Rotating in a horizontal plane at three and a half revolutions per minute, the three-sided transmitter could scan 100 million cubic miles of space per second. Operating in the L-band, each transmitter, equipped with two wideband klystron tubes, could be set to operate at its own frequency. This design and method of operation produced new images every six seconds.
 
Search signals from the transmitter were bounced back to the ZAR receiver, which was designed to rotate in sync with the transmitter. The receiver was a Luneberg lens with an associated reflecting ground plane. The “solid, hemispherical” lens itself was “constructed of thousands of polyfoam blocks, containing fine metal slivers, to obtain the necessary variation in dielectric constant.”
 
Feed horns and related equipment were situated on a truss system at the periphery of the lens. Incoming signals then would be focused by the lens and reflected by the ground plane and received by one or more of the feed horns, based upon the azimuth and elevation of the signal. The subsequent data was processed by the ZAR’s signal processing equipment, which would detect and consolidate radar returns, initiate tracks of new objects, maintain existing tracks, comparing new positions with expected locations based on earlier data, and predict impact points. It was this parameter that determined which objects were threatening. The ZAR complex on Kwajalein was deactivated two years later in November 1964.
The ZAR would be replaced by a new phased array radar the Multifunction Array Radar or MAR.

Offline Gator62

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2013, 08:48:27 am »
I stumbled onto this website and it was good to see a thread on a missile that I worked on.  When I graduated from college, I went to work for Douglas Aircraft in Missiles & Space.  I assigned to Nike Zeus Program and in propulsion.  The "B" Missile was already in flight test and the "C" Missile (Spartan) was on the drawing board.  Within the company, Spartan was DM15C (Douglas Missile, 15=Nike Zeus, C Model).  There was also an "S" Missile that was at the ready.

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2013, 03:03:21 pm »
Here's a Time of Flight Graph for Zeus A and Zeus B from WSEG 45

Revelant bit:

Quote
A high performance multi-stage rocket using combined aerodynamic and reaction control in a Canard configuration is to be used as the NIKE-ZEUS anti-missile missile.

A solid rocket booster provides thrust for 5 seconds and then separates at about 5.4 seconds after launch.

A sustainer solid-propellent rocket stage then fires, and by providing about 36 g's of axial acceleration, increases missile velocity to 11,400 ft/sec at burnout within about 19 seconds after launch.

Aerodynamic guidance is provided during sustainer action by the single guidance unit associated with the jet head.

Upon separation of the sustainer or at any time it is required thereafter, the jet head is further maneuvered by the same autopilot and guidance unit to eliminate end game errors. A solid-propellant reaction motor providing 100 g seconds of impulse exhausts for 3 seconds through four swiveling nozzles embedded in the aerodynamic control surfaces to provide exoatmospheric control.

A 20 g maneuver capability is maintained above 100,000 ft. altitude out to nearly 25 n.mi. and above 90,000 ft. altitude to beyond 50 n.mi.

Times of flight and maneuver capabilities of the Wingless NIKE-ZEUS missile are shown in Figure 2, together with the 75-second time-of-flight curve for the Winged (R&D) NIKE-ZEUS missile it will replace.

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2013, 03:09:06 pm »
The "B" Missile was already in flight test and the "C" Missile (Spartan) was on the drawing board.  Within the company, Spartan was DM15C (Douglas Missile, 15=Nike Zeus, C Model).  There was also an "S" Missile that was at the ready.
Was "S" the Project 20 / Advanced Spartan / Improved Spartan / Spartan II missile; or was it for something else; such as Anti-Satellite (ASAT) work?

Offline Gator62

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2013, 03:49:18 pm »
"S" was anti-satellite.  I worked on Improved Spartan but only a paper missile.

Offline sferrin

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2013, 06:12:22 pm »
I stumbled onto this website and it was good to see a thread on a missile that I worked on.  When I graduated from college, I went to work for Douglas Aircraft in Missiles & Space.  I assigned to Nike Zeus Program and in propulsion.  The "B" Missile was already in flight test and the "C" Missile (Spartan) was on the drawing board.  Within the company, Spartan was DM15C (Douglas Missile, 15=Nike Zeus, C Model).  There was also an "S" Missile that was at the ready.

Do you recall the weight of the Zeus A?  It's typically given as "11,000lbs" (about half of Zeus B ) and with the same 450,000lb thrust booster I'd think that thing would haul ass off the rail.  Was its acceleration much higher than Zeus B?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 07:30:05 pm by sferrin »
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline RyanC

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2013, 06:43:38 pm »
"S" was anti-satellite.  I worked on Improved Spartan but only a paper missile.
Do you remember much about Improved Spartan? We have a Spartan/Sprint thread over HERE.
 
Improved Spartan stuff starts on Page 6; from what little we understand of it in open sources; it would have had a new third stage which would have had the capability of being restarted in space after a 50-60 second coast phase, enabling "loiter" ABM; along with a smaller warhead compared to "Standard" Spartan.
 

Offline hark40

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Re: Nike Zeus and Derivatives
« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2013, 01:50:13 am »
Gator62 - Welcome!! You are going to be interrogated in a friendly manner here.  There are quite a few people interested in the work and the systems that you have worked on. So any info you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

Regarding designations, have a look at http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,11494.msg110253.html#msg110253 which summarises the Douglas designations of the various Zeus/Spartan missiles - at least what we think they are.