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Author Topic: Dassault Etendard II twin-engined fighter project  (Read 3254 times)

Offline hesham

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Dassault Etendard II twin-engined fighter project
« on: September 26, 2010, 04:30:08 am »
Hi,

the Dassault Etendard II was a lightweight twin-engined
naval fighter project;
http://www.vectorsite.net/aveten.html

Three prototypes of the Etendard II were ordered as well,
with the first performing its initial flight on 23 July 1956,
well before the first flight of the Etendard VI, with Paul
Bourdier at the controls. The Etendard II looked much like
the Etendard VI, except for a wider fuselage to accommodate
twin Turbomeca Gabizo turbojets, with 9.2 kN (940 kgp / 2,070 lbf)
thrust each, and with no wing dogtooth. The Etendard II was
slightly larger than the Etendard VI, with a length of 12.89
meters (42 feet 4 inches), a span of 8.74 meters (28 feet 8 inches),
and an empty weight of 4,120 kilograms (9,280 pounds).
Armament was to be twin 30 millimeter DEFA cannon in a pack
that could be swapped out with a pack for 32 Matra 68 millimeter
unguided rockets. Not surprisingly, given greater weight than the
Etendard VI but substantially less engine thrust, the Etendard II
was badly underpowered. This deficiency was in principle to be
addressed with an improved Gabizo with afterburning, but the
engine program foundered. Other engine fits were considered,
but the Etendard II was judged unpromising and cancelled in
November 1956. The second and third prototypes were never
built.

Offline Jemiba

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Re: Dassault Etendard II twin-engined fighter project
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2010, 06:38:29 am »
From Jean-Claude Fayer "Prototypes De L'Aviation Francaise 1945 - 1960":
It takes a long time, before all mistakes are made ...

Offline Petrus

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Re: Dassault Etendard II twin-engined fighter project
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2010, 07:49:33 am »
Here is an excerpt from the Flight magazine on what was then called the Mystere 22 (or XXII) (and subsequently became the Etendard II):

Quote
The Mystere 22 ordered by the French Government and the Mystere 26 ordered by NATO had virtually identical air-frames, differing only in the power plants installed, the " 22 " having two turbojets located in the fuselage side-by-side with a paired exhaust, and the " 26 " having a single 4,520 lb. thrust Bristol Orpheus B.Or.2 turbojet. The Mystere 22.01 would eventually be powered by two Turbo-meca Gabizo units which would provide a total maximum thrust of 4,840 lb. and a total maximum cruising thrust of 3,880 lb., but initial flight tests were likely to be conducted late 1956 with two 1,640 thrust Dassault M.D.30 (licence-built A.S. Vipers) installed. The Mystere 22-02 would receive either two R.800 or two R.105 Vesta turbojets for comparative trials, and the third machine -the Mystere 22M- would be a deck-landing variant with A- frame arrester hook, long-stroke under-carriage, catapult spools, etc., in which Aeronavale evinced some interest.
A family resemblance to the larger Mystere fighters can be seen in the wing and tail geometry which is common to both Mysteres 22 and 26. The entire nose section of the fuselage, including the cockpit, is identical on both machines. The wing is swept 45 at quarter chord, has a thickness/chord ratio of six per cent and a span of 25 ft. 4 3/4 in. Overall length and height are 37 ft. 2 in. and 12 ft. 5 1/2 in. respectively. Armament comprises a pair of 30mm. French-built DEFA revolver cannon, similar to the British Aden gun, which are combined with the ammunition (120 rounds per gun) in a detachable pack, which can be winched in and out of the fuselage. Avions Marcel Dassault proposed to augment this armament in the case of the Mystere 22 with an internal rocket missile tray. This tray would project the firing and will be expendable so that it will be unnecessary to retract the tray after firing the salvos of rockets. Owing to the use of two turbojets, the Mystere 22 was somewhat heavier than the Mystere 26, the maximum loaded weight of the latter being some 9,000-10,000 pounds. Both machines carried underwing loads comprising two 500 lb. bombs and twelve 3 in. rocket projectiles, or alternative ordnance loads. The Mystere 24, incidentally, was a projected experimental variant of the basic design with a SNECMA Atar 101G engine.

Below you'll find a photo from the Flight magazine, whose caption says it shows the Etendard IV, but my feeling what may be seen in the picture is the Etendard II as well as profile drawings of the Etendard family (a scan from now defunct Polish magazine "Aero").

Best regards,
Piotr

Offline Jemiba

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Re: Dassault Etendard II twin-engined fighter project
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2010, 11:20:28 am »
"...but my feeling what may be seen in the picture is the Etendard II "

Hard to tell, but from size and shape of the intakes and the fact, that there's
a landing light at the nose wheel strut, it could be the Etendard IV, I think
It takes a long time, before all mistakes are made ...

Offline hesham

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Re: Dassault Etendard Prototypes and Projects
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2015, 08:46:58 am »
Hi,


I renamed this topic,instead off open a new one.


Here is the early drawing to Dassault Etendard VI (formally Mystere XXVI) early and
initial 3-view from Air Pictorial 4/1955 and Avions De Combat I,also the prototype
for original aircraft actually built.