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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Schneiderman on Today at 08:50:10 am »
Do you really think there are sufficient potential authors out there, who have carried out extensive in-depth research to academic standards, to populate a magazine on a regular basis? Those that do work at that level, including several who conribute on this forum, have often found the material better suited to monographs and books, and I would agree with that strategy. I welcome the occasional magazine articles that do get submitted and published as they are generally well-written and informative, but it is a fine line before such material strays into niche territory and ends up just as numbing as the endless registration lists and individual aircraft histories that dulled so many Air Britain publications, although I have to say I don't believe I have read any of the more recent editions produced under Chris' tenure (I generally check out the index of contents and buy any that appear interesting secondhand from ebay sellers). At one point I held discussions about having a book published by AB, but their insistence that it had to include reg/history stuff provided by them put me off.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Hood on Today at 08:45:31 am »
That's a hefty wish list, how many authors know enough about topics like "Hs 129 handling and performance analysis", "Hawker Typhoon structural failures - history and analysis" etc.?
You are probably looking more at engineering than history here unless an historian has access to lots of flight test data from archival sources. Its not impossible such articles exist in old copies of Aeroplane and Flight, but of course only the latter have been digitised.

Aeroplane were running a monthly subscription-only of selected reprinted old issues, not sure if that's still going though.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Pasoleati on Today at 08:17:37 am »
DIN A4.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by CJGibson on Today at 07:55:37 am »
Get after it then!

A4?

Chris
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Pasoleati on Today at 07:26:59 am »
Chris, thanks!

What I would like to see in English would be something as follows:

-quarterly A4, 96 pages on glossy paper, preferably staple-bound
-emphasis on pre-1945 (max. 30 % post-1945)
-majority of the pages reserved for an average of 5 long feature articles
-feature articles based on primary research meeting academic standards (reference notes)
-a regular section (10ish pages) reserved to original verbatim documents like test reports and design memos
-emphasis on aircraft development, testing, production, engineering
-combat histories should be analitycal, not chronicles
-max. 6 - 7 pages ads
-detailed structural drawings and performance curves
-main text Adobe Jenson Pro 10 pt, 3 columns, fully justified, ref. notes at the bottom on each page/spread
-feature article headlines e.g. "Hs 129 handling and performance analysis", "Hawker Typhoon structural failures - history and analysis", "Nakajima Homare - development, engineering and field experience", "Hughes XF-11 - Development, Testing, Handling, Performance", "F4U Corsair spinning testing".

I would happily pay 15 euros, even 20, for each issue.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by CJGibson on Today at 06:58:11 am »
 Here:

http://www.air-britain.com/aeromil.html

As ever, they don't update the website very often. Ignore the spiel at the side, there's a new sheriff in town.

Chris
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Pasoleati on Today at 06:45:32 am »
Hood: I have seen Cross & Cockade and indeed it is very good. Though I have not yet subscribed to it. I totally agree on Air International and Flight. I regularly bought the former when e.g. Roy Braybrook was still writing columns.

Chris: is there anywhere sample pages of Aeromilitaria available? What is the page count?
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by CJGibson on Today at 06:22:38 am »
'...are they fixated to serial numbers like so many Air-Britain books...'

Not with me as editor!

Last issue had an article on Finnish Hawk 75s. I like to include at least one 'long read' (a la The Grauniad) of about 10-12 pages, recently Greg Baughen on the battleplanes of WW1 or Vic Flintham on the beginning of the RAF in 1918. I've been covering the Post-1950 specifications and Tony Buttler is a regular contributor, most recently on engine testbeds. Our very own Hood has contributed to it on transports and one recent article that has prompted quite a bit of interest is the VIP Dakotas used by the British top brass in WW2.

If you had your fill of endless articles of 1500 words and 10 pics on warbirds/F-35/Typhoon/A350/Dreamliner, I'd say The Aviation Historian and Aeromiltaria would suit you better (unless you dislike the layout)

As I always say, what's the point of moaning if you won't do anything about it? As Schneiderman says, write something, submit it and see if they'll run it. I'll have a look at just about anything that isn't about F-35/Typhoon/A350/Dreamliner.

Chris
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Hood on Today at 05:40:46 am »
I actually think Aeroplane has improved enormously since Key Publishing took it over a couple of years ago (contrary to what I was expecting). The text to picture ratio has improved from what it was and they genuinely try to find a nice mix of informative articles and they do have an international flavour of authors. The in-depth aircraft features can be very useful, it depends on the author as to the quality but they tend to be fairly good. I don't think I've brought a copy in the last year or so and thought "there's nothing of interest here," and their archive of images deserve to be shown I feel. Flypast has gotten too shallow and too swallowed up by 'arty' effects and far too many photos.

I used to be an avid reader of Air International a decade ago, but now its just a glorified poster book devoid of detail. Flight has degenerated into a business round-up and to be honest if you keep up to date on Flightglobal there is little point buying it (though Uncle Roger's Christmas Quiz is good!). I still miss Air Enthusiast, alas I only really started buying in shortly before it closed but at least I still have the last six issues. There was a short-lived magazine Wingspan International which seemed promising around 2002 but it soon died.

There are a couple of non-Key Publishing magazines that are ok, one military (Combat Aircraft) and one a mixture of civil, military and heritage (Aviation News), but again if you want walls of text you're probably out of luck.

Air Britain is a mixed bag, Aeromilitaria is very good, Aviation World has items of interest but again tends to be stuffed full of holiday snaps and in trying to appeal to everyone tends to satisfy no-one and Archive for historic civil aviation buffs tends to be long lists of registrations with few articles and terrible layout.

Have you tried Cross & Cockade? I haven't personally but I believe its pretty good for WW1 research and topics.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Schneiderman on Today at 03:40:06 am »
.......... however it rarely covers subjects I am interested in.
I would think that Nick and Mick would be a little alarmed to hear you say that as you are more than likely representative of many of their target readership, albeit considerably more knowledgeable than most. Perhaps you would consider submitting an article to them, which may serve to trigger others with similar interests to do likewise. You era of interest is a little too recent for me, in general, but new insight is always worth a read.
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