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Thanks to you all for your comments!
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: M-15 Jet Biplane - Chem/Bio Weapon?
« Last post by Richard N on Today at 01:23:13 pm »
Thank you Hesham  ;D

What was the intended role for the agricultural jet floatplane aircraft?  :o

My guess is that it would be used for landing closer to fields - allowing refuelling and reloading of chemicals without having to fly back to a supporting airfield. Either that or it is for use as a Bush plane. Either way, In Canada we around three million lakes - so I can definitely see the attraction.


Floatplanes and other aircraft with water landing capability can land in places where there are no airfields like forests with lakes and along coastlines and bays.  The best of both worlds is to have amphibious capability with landing gear that retracts into the floats.  Another M-15 version is shown with skis for dealing with snow.  With the versions proposed, it could have joined the family of Bushplanes that have to be able to operate from land, water, and snow to be able to work in places like like Canada and Alaska.
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Aerospace / Re: Test Pilots
« Last post by Boxman on Today at 12:59:57 pm »
H/T to Alert 5.

Northrop test pilot Hank Chouteau passed away.

As per the Tartan Terror TEST & RESEARCH PILOTS, FLIGHT TEST ENGINEERS webpage, Chouteau:

"[P]iloted first flights in nine aircraft including the YF-5A, F-5A, F-5E, the CF-5A and CF-5B in Canada, the NF-5 in the Netherlands, and the YF-17 prototype for the F-18 Navy Strike Fighter. He helped develop the F-18L Cobra, F-89J atomic weapon equipment interceptor, the T-38 supersonic trainer, the A-9 ground attack fighter, the F-5A Freedom Fighter and the F-5E international Fighter."

From the Contra Costa Times:

Hank Chouteau, former Northrop test pilot, dies at 89
by Brian Sumers
POSTED:   04/18/2014 08:07:26 PM PDT

As a child living in rural Wyoming in the 1930s, Henry E. “Hank” Chouteau would wait each week for the airplane carrying the mail. The pilots were like celebrities, bringing news from the world into Pinedale, a small town 280 miles northeast of Salt Lake City.

Sensing her son’s interest, Chouteau’s mom started buying him flying magazines. Later, they would prove useful.

When it came time for him to apply for the Army Air Corps during World War II, Chouteau was prepared. He was the only one of his friends who made it as a pilot.

“The magazines were his leg up,” said his grandson, Graham Chouteau-Lathrop.

He went on to a successful career as a chief test pilot for what is now Northrop Grumman Corp., helping to shape many of the most important combat aircraft of the late 20th century, including the F/A-18 Hornet.

Chouteau, who lived in Lancaster before retiring to New Mexico, died Tuesday from complications of pancreatic cancer. He was 89.

He began his flying career in Europe as a member of the Army Air Corps’ 587th Bombardment Squadron. He then joined the Air Force, flying the F-51 Mustang in the Korean War. He began working at Northrop in 1952.

Chouteau was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the air medal with four clusters, four Battle Stars, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the South Vietnamese Cross of Honor, among many other accolades, according to his plaque in the Lancaster Aerospace Walk of Honor.

At Northrop, Chouteau was probably best known for his contribution to the YF-17 prototype fighter aircraft, said his friend and former co-worker, Mike Kennedy. In the mid-1970s, Chouteau would fly the plane at air shows and engage in daring maneuvers to demonstrate its capabilities, Kennedy said.

The Navy was sold. It used the YF-17 as the template for the F/A 18, a plane the Navy still employs as its primary aircraft carrier-based fighter jet.

“Hank had a very straightforward attitude,” Kennedy said. “He was a no nonsense guy. He rubbed some people the wrong way because he was very determined. But those who worked with Hank and knew him well knew that Hank was determined that the customer was going to get the best that Northrop could provide.”

(Rest of Obituary Linked at Title)
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: M-15 Jet Biplane - Chem/Bio Weapon?
« Last post by ADVANCEDBOY on Today at 12:27:52 pm »
 I don` kow about this airplane but aerosol delivery program, for example for   solar dimming/geoengineering is applicable to vast diversity of jet airplanes. Not to be confused  with silver iodine  spraying for cloudseeding .  I can not post all patents for aerosol spraying methods, as there are more than  300 patents directly related to this.  But having talked to some closely related people, the delivery  is activated via ballast tanks in wings. In many cases hollowed static wicks are used to disperse trimethilaluminium, barium salts and strontium. Surprisingly commercial jet pilots don`t even know about it in most cases, as the delivery  of Welsbach materials is activated via GPS and complex geo-weather programmes. The original purpose was to dim solar corona as viewed from the largest populated areas. You don`t have to believe me, actually forget what I just said:)
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(Not related to above) In the years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, some reporting names were circulated for the latest aircraft prototypes as follows, but I can't determine for sure whether they are bogus or real:
  • FLATPACK (MiG-1.44 MFI)
  • FIRKIN (Su-47 Berkut)
  • MISER (MiG-AT)
  • MAXDOME (Il-80 VKP = Il-87)
  • MITTEN (Yak-130)
Also some Chinese types were apparently named as follows:
  • CHAN (Harbin Y-11)
  • FLOUNDER (Xi'an JH-7)
As I no longer trust Wikipedia, and find dubious many of the online resources, can someone refer to a RELIABLE source for these names (IF they are legit at all of course). What is the authoritative document that provides such official namings, anyway? Thanks a lot in advance for your answers!

All of those are correct as far as I can remember.
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For the record! the Falcon 30 fuselage (everything else appears to be gone) is part of the CAEA collection - see my signature...
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The 40x80 SHARC Model did have a plenum in the nose.  The nose had a total of 6-nozzles (3/side).  The 40x80 provided the high pressure air and the mass flow (Cmu) all which was varied.  But,  the specifics can be found in the aforementioned reports. 

The SHARC model had two different blowing schemes in the nose (down selected from the 7x10 wind tunnel test); 1) Tangential (back across the nose surface) and straight out.  The tangential blowing worked best.

SHARCMastger

Didn't they test something like that on an F/A-18?   ???
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Patent Pending / Re: Miles Tailless Twin Boom Aircraft
« Last post by Stargazer on Today at 10:54:13 am »
Thought I knew pretty much every Miles project but once again this proves that the more one thinks one knows, the less one does!

Thanks to Tophe (though he no longer visits here) and hesham for sharing this.
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The 40x80 SHARC Model did have a plenum in the nose.  The nose had a total of 6-nozzles (3/side).  The 40x80 provided the high pressure air and the mass flow (Cmu) all which was varied.  But,  the specifics can be found in the aforementioned reports. 

The SHARC model had two different blowing schemes in the nose (down selected from the 7x10 wind tunnel test); 1) Tangential (back across the nose surface) and straight out.  The tangential blowing worked best.

SHARCMastger
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Aerospace / Re: Chengdu J-20 pictures, analysis and speculation Part II
« Last post by Deino on Today at 10:39:16 am »
Thanks for posting this nice belly shot ... very interesting indeed, esp. to see how wide and deep these tail-spnsoons are ...Here are two more nice ones.
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