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Aerospace / Re: F-117A spotted flying over Nevada: CONFIRMED
« Last post by Flyaway on Today at 02:29:16 am »
They are out & about again in Nevada.

http://www.lazygranch.com/bat15.html

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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: CAC CA.26 and CA.27
« Last post by Jan den Das on Today at 01:47:01 am »
Thanks for this, good, materials.
Is/are there any 3 (or more) side view darwings of the Australian versions?
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Theoretical and Speculative Projects / Re: Sea Gull Flying Boat
« Last post by Arjen on Today at 12:57:05 am »
Not a flying boat, but an ekranoplan or ground effect vehicle.
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Aerospace / Re: Boeing Confident in Production of Super Hornet Beyond 2017
« Last post by Ian33 on Yesterday at 11:55:11 pm »
The UK screwed up not making our carriers cat and trap. The Growler is a formidable and vital asset, as well as a mean as hell aircraft to try fight against.

I got talking to a Typhoon pilot who spent time on the aircraft and he marvelled about its ability to kill an aircraft dead in the air by electronics alone, then add insult to injury and shoot it down.
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Aerospace / Re: Kawasaki P-X and C-X
« Last post by blackkite on Yesterday at 11:53:17 pm »
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Aerospace / Re: Standing seats on airliners
« Last post by DWG on Yesterday at 09:48:21 pm »
The other problem with standing seating that designers seem to forget about is passengers who can't stand. Both the US and EU have fairly tough regs (US - Air Carrier Access Act, EU - Rights of Passengers With Reduced Mobility When Travelling By Air) that apply to any flight within or into their territory and that means you have to be able to seat both wheelchair users (by having seats we can transfer into) and ambulant disabled passengers, and that can add up to a fairly big group of people when you include passengers (for example many of the elderly) who can walk aboard, but can't stand for an hour plus. So you absolutely need conventional seating in all classes. You can't price the standing seating lower (which ISTR was one of Ryanair's suggestions when this first cropped up), as that would create a discount inaccessible to disabled passengers, which is positively inviting enforcement action (DOT has levied some pretty ferocious fines for ACAA violations), while trying to have mixed normal and standing seating at the same price would create an uproar from passengers expected to use the 'less good' standing seating.

And then there's the problem of children. It doesn't matter if a kid's feet don't touch the ground in a conventional seat, but in a standing seat it's potentially a major problem, and standing endurance again becomes an issue.
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Aerospace / Re: YF-4E demonstrator enhanced maneuverability
« Last post by Jemiba on Yesterday at 09:13:10 pm »
Perhaps you should search for the report linked by hesham in this thread
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,5597.msg192938.html#msg192938
Not directly available anymore, but maybe someone still has it.
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Aerospace / Boeing Confident in Production of Super Hornet Beyond 2017
« Last post by Triton on Yesterday at 07:10:32 pm »
Boeing Confident in Production of Super Hornet Beyond 2017
By Allyson Versprille
July 30, 2015

Source:
http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=7c996cd7-cbb4-4018-baf8-8825eada7aa2&ID=1914

Quote
As Boeing continues discussions with both foreign and domestic customers, a company executive said he is confident that international demand and a strong desire for the aircraft by the U.S. Navy will push production of Super Hornets and Growlers past 2017.

The Navy did not request funding for Super Hornets in its fiscal year 2016 budget proposal. However, in March the service solicited Congress for additional aircraft in its unfunded priorities list. Lawmakers are still deciding whether or not to fund those 12 aircraft, worth $1.15 billion.

In the document, the Navy stated “our legacy strike fighters (F/A-18A-D) are reaching end of life faster than planned due to use and wear. Improving the inventory of F/A-18F and F-35C aircraft will help reconcile a near term (2018-2020) strike fighter inventory capacity challenge, and longer term (2020-2035) strike fighter model balance within the carrier air wing. It will reduce our reliance on legacy-model aircraft which are becoming increasingly expensive and less reliable.”

Daniel Gillian, vice president of F/A-18 and EA-18G programs for Boeing Defense, said he is optimistic that the House and Senate Armed Services Committees — as well as defense appropriations subcommittees — will support the push for more Super Hornets.

"I think near-term FY16 a lot of the momentum is behind Super Hornet and the committees that mark down Super Hornet, [and] we see that holding up," he said.

There are also positive signs from Kuwait, where discussions on purchasing the aircraft are currently taking place, he told reporters.

"Ongoing discussions in the Middle East are certainly moving forward and we're confident that we're moving towards something there, along with [the] FY16" Navy requests, Gillian said.  "We're seeing enough demand signals from the market to make a decision to continue moving forward with production."

In May, Reuters reported that the deal with Kuwait would involve 28 Boeing Super Hornets and would total more than $3 billion. Such a deal would keep the company's mixed-model Super Hornet and Growler production line in Saint Louis, Missouri, open until 2019, Gillian said.

"Currently production with the 15 Growlers from last year that were added in FY15, goes through December 2017," he said. If the company lands both Kuwait and the 12 planes for the U.S. Navy, production will be pushed out to the fall of 2019.

There are also opportunities in Denmark, which is currently seeking to procure a new fighter jet. Boeing is proposing 24 to 36 of the two-seat variant of the Super Hornet, Gillian said. The company faces competition from Lockheed Martin's F-35 joint strike fighter. Denmark is expected to make a downselect decision in the fourth quarter of this year. Such a sale — in addition to the aforementioned opportunities — would extend production through 2021, Gillian said.

Canada and Belgium are two other possibilities for Super Hornet sales, he noted.

In Canada, the issue is whether the nation will pursue an election that results in a change in government, he said. "We think a change in government would lead to a potential discussion about a competition. Right now, they're on a path to the F-35."

Belgium is following Denmark's decision but a downselect would be years away, Gillian added.

Boeing is in the process of slowing down production of the aircraft in coming years from three per month — its current rate — to two per month in the first quarter of next calendar year, he said.

He stressed the importance of future Super Hornet sales for the company, especially within the United States.

"I think the 12 planes are particularly important in the context of the Super Hornet shortfall that the CNO [chief of naval operations] discussed in his testimony," he said. In April, Adm. Jonathan Greenert said the Navy has a "Super Hornet shortfall" of at least two or three squadrons — the equivalent of 24 to 36 aircraft.

"The Super Hornet is truly the workhorse of naval combat operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant," Greenert said before the House Armed Services Committee. "It is an absolutely critical, in-demand weapon against our enemies."

Gillian said keeping production lines open is also essential on an international level. "It's important because it's part of a bigger discussion and it allows the international market to continue to develop a lot of the discussion about Growler force structure."

The company wants to continue employing the team it has in place, he said. "It is certainly important to Boeing for continuing to employ the team that we have with all of the skills they have to continue building an airplane that can land on an aircraft carrier, which is a unique and perishable skill set."
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Aerospace / YF-4E demonstrator enhanced maneuverability
« Last post by kcran567 on Yesterday at 07:06:03 pm »
Yf-4e demonstrator with uprated engines and canard. Anyone have more
 info on this project?  Was it fly by wire? There were claims it had f-15 like performance and could turn inside an f-16.
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