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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: SNCASE (Sud-Est) SE.2010 Armagnac
« Last post by Tonton-42 on Today at 04:35:21 am »
Are you in my S.N.C.A.S.E SE-2010 Armagnac appreciation group on facebook?

Terry (Caravellarella)

Sorry but I have not found how connect me (I'm too old to understand ???) ! But that interrests me !

Tonton
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: J W Dunne projects
« Last post by Schneiderman on Today at 04:16:44 am »
By the way I have never found any mention of Dunne in post-War RAeC publications. Does anyone know whether he ever presented any papers or participated in the question-and-answer sessions after presentations? Curiously at Hill's presentation on his tailless aircraft experiments in 1926 Dunne does not appear to have been present, which is a little odd.
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Aerospace / Re: SpaceX Grasshopper: VTVL Falcon 9 1st stage RLV
« Last post by flanker on Today at 04:13:58 am »
I am about 99% sure that the glow has nothing to do with hydrailic fluid or anything but just good old air pressure. The actual grids are large enough to let the air pass through but in that area it is tighter so the air is trapped.

And that landing footage is honestly the most amazing thing i have seen in my life.
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: J W Dunne projects
« Last post by Schneiderman on Today at 04:13:18 am »
It is curious that as a self-proclaimed 'expert' in all-matters related to aviation I can find no record that P B ever flew other than the short flights required to obtain his aviator's certificate.
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Naval Projects / Re: never build japanese aircraft carriers
« Last post by Tzoli on Today at 03:57:11 am »
There are some designs and proposals for Japanese carriers which never built. Sadly only a few have drawings, but here are the list of the never built ones and drawings I know to exist:

Shokaku (Hosho's never built Sister) Variant 1 (9.500tons) - 1920 (only data table exists)
Shokaku (Hosho's never built Sister) Variant 2 (10.000tons) - 1920 (only data table exists)
Kaga Preliminary Design A - 1923 (drawing available)
Kaga Preliminary Design B - 1923 (drawing available)
Akagi Preliminary Design - 1923 (drawing available)
Unknown cruiser-carrier design - 1926 (10.000tons) (drawing available)
Design G-5 light carrier (9.800tons) - 1932 (no drawing or data available)
Design G-6 cruiser-carrier, Soryu preliminary (17.500tons) - 1932 (drawing available)
Design G-8 fleet carrier, Soryu preliminary (17.500tons) - 1933 (drawing available)
Design W-105 cruiser-carrier, Oyodo preliminary (16.600tons) - 1938 (drawing available)
Design G-12 fleet carrier, Taiho preliminary (17.000tons) - 1941 (no drawing or data available)
Design G-14 fleet carrier (50.000tons) - 1942 (no drawing or data available)
Design G-15 fleet carrier, Taiho-Kai (30.100tons) - 1942 (drawing available)
Myoko class light carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing but some data available)
Takao class light carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing but some data available)
Mogami class light carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing but some data available)
Tone class light carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (drawing available)
Kongo class fleet carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing or data available)
Ise class fleet carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing or data available)
Fuso class fleet carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (drawing available)
Nagato class fleet carrier conversion  - 1942/43 (no drawing or data available)
Fuso class aviation battleship conversion  - 1943 (drawing available)
Design G-18 light carrier (Improved Ibuki?) (15.500tons) - 1944 (only data exists)
CVH proposal (8.000tons) - 1960 (artist impression)

Ask which should I provide :)


I have no knowledge of the design G-19 if existed.
The last carriers are:

G-13 - Taiho class (1941)
G-14 - 50000-ton carrier design (1942)
G-15 - Taiho-Kai class (1942)
G-16 - Unryu class (1942)
G-17 - Shinano class (1942)
G-18 CVL 15.500tons 2x2 76mm, 42 aircrafts (1944)
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Aerospace / Re: Lockheed Martin F-22A Raptor
« Last post by gtg947h on Today at 03:44:59 am »
You'd think they'd have learned their lesson by now.  If they "go slow" on 6th gen most of those who worked on the design of the F-22 will be retired and we'll be looking at another 20 year development cycle.

There's no new engineers graduation? No new engineers being hired? Knowledge in companies goes away with the people? I wonder how Boeing manages to make 777s now that everyone who worked on 747 retired?
Boeing built two new designs and refreshed a third in the time between the 747 and 777.  In the general sense, that's what you want to do--you want to have people being involved in at least two or three program development cycles over their careers (and preferably throw them into the support side for a while, too).  In doing so, a lot of that knowledge gets passed along to the new guys from the old graybeards--stuff like "yeah, we tried that before, and it didn't work, and here's why".  Anyone can look at a drawing and see what was done on the old airplanes; having the old guys around tells you why it was done that way.  This goes all the way up the chain, from the guy bucking rivets on the production line to the design engineers to the VPs managing the program. 

Today, new programs are spread much further apart than they used to be, and often those new programs are more or less just derivatives of existing ones.  An engineer entering the field today may be lucky to work on one whole new clean-sheet program from early design through service and support in the field. 
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: J W Dunne projects
« Last post by avion ancien on Today at 03:42:27 am »
As this thread has had its tangential moments, perhaps I can crave your indulgence to permit another, albeit briefly. Nol Pemberton Billing was an 'interesting' character whose rle beyond the early years of aviation was significant only if seen through his eyes. Perhaps one of the best illustrations of this was his 1936 contribution to popular flying, the Pemberton-Billing Skylark. Only the kindest of critics could suggest that it contributed anything of value to aviation. However it does show that whilst he chose not to follow the well trodden path, the path he did choose was neither revolutionary, innovative or ingenious (even though it might be said that he pinched the basic idea from Henri Mignet and then managed to produce something significantly poorer than the original HM.14). One might describe the Skylark as pathetic if it hadn't been so hare brained as to be positively dangerous to anyone who might have been foolish enough to try to coax it into the air - but fortunately it was not completed and never flew. Had it done so, Pemberton Billing might not have survived until 1948 and may have shuffled off this mortal coil in a manner not dissimilar to that of Frank Barnwell and Richard Taylor!
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: J W Dunne projects
« Last post by Schneiderman on Today at 03:35:15 am »
The Royal Aero Club online material is only a partial set of all its committee minute books, so any "nothing but" judgement based on such a limited docuemnt set does not stand up.
Not at all. All of the main and subcommittee minute books have been scanned and made available on line. They represent a complete record of all the Club's activities.
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You spoil us sir!
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