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Military / Re: Modern Chinese destroyer breaks down in the Indian Ocean
« Last post by VH on Today at 06:14:16 pm »
This PLAN ship was one of their new build modern destroyers. Hence her accompanying this showcase flotilla to Russia. According to analysis included in the book "Chinese Naval Shipbuilding" by Andrew Erickson, power including both propulsion and the powering of onboard systems remains the Achilles heel of Chinese warships. This incident seems to support that contention.
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The Bar / Re: Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD)
« Last post by Triton on Today at 04:54:26 pm »

Really hoping for a Peacekeeper sized ICBM expecting to be disappointed. Maybe LRSO will be hypersonic?

I'm also hoping that there will be a new road mobile ICBM like the MGM-134.


I really hope I'm wrong but I'm expecting "new" refurbished MMIIIs with "new" "4th generation" Tomahawks.  The same that lost to the AGM-86 30+ years ago.

I guess that also depends on if the LRSO is manufactured by Raytheon.
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Quote
Background:
In order to better optimize future aircraft, it will be necessary to analyze and evaluate all aspects of the aircraft as an integrated system from conceptual design through prototype demonstration. Desired system capabilities exceed what can be provided by superposition of individual mission subsystems into an air platform and engine(s) designed purely for individual component performance. Technologies for power, thermal, and control must be developed as part of the integrated air platform and engine system. This ability for continued refinement through- out the aircraft design cycle, from system concepts into detailed design validation to demonstration and test, will allow development of a more capable and efficient aircraft.

Airframer Objective:

The objective on NGT-PAC is to conduct research to study, develop, demonstrate, integrate and transition power, thermal and controls technologies coupled with vehicle propulsion. Advances in these technologies will allow the development of the next generation of UAVs and manned aircraft. The goal of this effort will be to conduct basic, applied, and advanced development research on UAVs, Air Dominance, ISR, hypersonic and mobility platforms. Offerers will be required to examine the aircraft impacts of integrating a high power laser into an existing fighter or bomber aircraft. The best scientific and technological solution is required for this acquisition.

Engine Objective:

The objective of NGT-PAC is to conduct research to study, develop, demonstrate, integrate and transition power, thermal, and control technologies for air platforms that take advantage of capabilities offered by, and minimize the limitations of, existing and future engine technologies. Advances in these technologies will allow the development of the next generation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and manned aircraft to be fielded. The goal of this effort will be to conduct basic, applied, and advanced development research and demonstration on UAVS, Air Dominance, ISR, hypersonic, and mobility platforms. Offerers will be required to examine how dual spool power extraction (DSPE) would be retrofitted into a current fighter or bomber engine. The best scientific and technological solution is required for this acquisition.

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The Bar / Re: Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD)
« Last post by sferrin on Today at 03:52:09 pm »

Really hoping for a Peacekeeper sized ICBM expecting to be disappointed. Maybe LRSO will be hypersonic?

I really hope I'm wrong but I'm expecting "new" refurbished MMIIIs with "new" "4th generation" Tomahawks.  The same that lost to the AGM-86 30+ years ago.
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Air Force awards $1.2B in engine technology contracts


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The Air Force this week awarded General Electric a $409 million contract to support next-generation engine technology development, the latest in a string of awards to airframe and engine developers.

Since June 30, the service has awarded more than $1.2 billion in indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contracts to three companies -- GE, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman -- for the Next-Generation Thermal Power and Controls program. To date, each contract has been worth up to $409 million, service spokesman Daryl Mayer told Inside the Air Force July 13. The program expects additional awards in the near future.

Pratt & Whitney will likely receive one of those future awards -- the service on July 11 announced an award to the company, but retracted the announcement July 12 saying "the contract has not yet been awarded."

The program's goal is to "develop revolutionary and innovative technologies" by the 2024 time frame and to improve the Air Force's understanding of the thermal, power and controls requirements for future propulsion systems, according to the contract announcements. The notices state the work will help "prove technological feasibility and assess operability and producability of thermal, power, and controls components and architectures through proof of principal demonstrations."

Program officials would not provide much detail about the scope or the number and value of future awards, but the contract announcements note the service received seven bids for the effort.

More Information on the Next-Generation Thermal Power and Controls (NGT-PAC) :

Quote
Next generation fighter aircraft are likely to require an unprecedented level of advanced capabilities in order to ensure air superiority in contested environments. These capabilities, which include advanced electronic attack, high-power laser, and future low-observability features, are expected to require as much as 10x higher power levels than current tactical systems.

These power system demands requirements present multifaceted electrical and thermal challenges in an integrated flight worthy system. Modern vehicle design factors including composite aircraft skins, higher efficiency engines, and highly embedded vehicle systems compound these challenges. This solicitation seeks research in order to better understand the challenges and opportunities of, and advance the state of the art in, next generation aircraft thermal, power, and controls.
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Aerospace / Re: New Russian SAT SR-10 trainer
« Last post by GTX on Today at 03:15:38 pm »
Quite attractive:


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The Bar / Re: Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD)
« Last post by bobbymike on Today at 02:56:29 pm »
Lt. Gen. Bunch mentioned that the contract award is expected in September for both GBSD and LRSO.

According to Lockheed Martin's CEO, as of July 16th 2017, September is still the timeframe for GBSD and LRSO.
Really hoping for a Peacekeeper sized ICBM expecting to be disappointed. Maybe LRSO will be hypersonic?
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Aerospace / Re: Lockheed Martin F-35: News ONLY topic
« Last post by Triton on Today at 02:23:45 pm »
So ol' Pierre Sprey is the best they could role out... ::)

Sprey is the richest man in the poor house.  ;)
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Speed and range could be key for Navy's next fighter jet


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WASHINGTON — The Navy is knee deep in an analysis on how best to replace its Super Hornet and Growler aircraft. Though much work is still left to be done, the resulting platform could look a lot different than both those jets, with a much higher priority on range and speed.

The service kicked off its “Next Generation Air Dominance” analysis of alternatives in January 2016 to study potential replacements for the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and E/A-18G Growler. (Confusingly, the Air Force has used the NGAD term to describe its own analysis of alternatives for an F-22 follow-on aircraft, but the services’ efforts are not connected and there are no plans to pursue a joint fighter).

Now, after about a year and a half, the Navy team feels they have a complete understanding of what capabilities the future carrier strike group needs to have and, importantly, what threats it will face, Capt. Richard Brophy, who is working the AoA effort as part of the service’s air warfare division, said during a panel at the Office of Naval Research’s science and technology expo.

“The tradespace is completely wide open as we look at what is going to replace those airplanes,” he said, adding that the “family of systems” that replace the Super Hornet and Growler could include a fighter jet , but perhaps also include shipboard systems or multiple aircraft working together.

Although the study is not slated to wrap up until at least April, Brophy offered his thoughts on some key capabilities for NGAD.

For one, it could be unmanned or optionally manned, as was the hope of former Navy Secretary Ray Mabus.

“It is not lost on us that A.I. [artificial intelligence], unmanned, it’s coming and it’s out there, and we need to be able to incorporate that into what we’re looking at out there,” Brophy said.

One key attribute that NGAD will likely incorporate is a longer range — something Brophy says is a significant limitation for the current carrier air wing.

“I tend to think of it not only as range, but as reach. Not only how far my airplane flies, but how far do my weapons go on top of that,” he said. “Reach also gets into propulsion, and when we look at propulsion, I’m looking for efficiency. The longer I can fly without having to go get gas, the better.”

Another critical capability is a throwback to the F-14 Tomcat-era of flight operations: the need for high speed.

Brophy said the Navy, which has historically been more skeptical of stealth than the Air Force, will likely incorporate some low observable capabilities into its future NGAD capability. But it is still undetermined as to whether it becomes as high of a priority as it was for the F-35 joint strike fighter.

“We certainly need survivability. Stealth is just one piece of the survivability equation,” he said. “I kind of look at stealth as sort of like chaff and flares. It’s not going to defeat [the enemy] every time, but it will help. Stealth is part of what any future design — if you look at any country, they’re going that way. So, yes it would probably be part of it.”

Bill Nickerson, a program officer for ONR’s division of aerospace sciences, added that the office is investing in stealth as well as other technologies that would improve survivability, such as ultra-lightweight armor and counter-directed energy capabilities.

As the AoA progresses, the Navy will look at multiple options to replace the Super Hornet and Growler. The first option — to do nothing — will likely be quickly ruled out because the service will need capacity as those aircraft begin retiring in the mid 2030s, Brophy said.

The team will also consider whether Navy can meet the threats it encounters in the 2040 timeframe with simply by buying more Super Hornets, Growlers and F-35Cs, or whether it could upgrade versions of those platforms could accomplish those missions.

Finally, the Navy will look a starting a new program that includes some “transformational capabilities.” However, Brophy acknowledged that the service will need to keep cost low enough to buy a high volume of air vehicles.

“Numbers matter. We’ve got to be able to have enough aircraft out there,” he said.
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Aerospace / Re: Lockheed Martin F-35: News ONLY topic
« Last post by GTX on Today at 01:21:38 pm »
So ol' Pierre Sprey is the best they could role out... ::)
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