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Go back even further for an actual example - the P-51 was originally designed by North American to a British requirement, and if only they had put a Merlin in it from the start (even a high-blown single-stage), it might have done wonders earlier than it did. And everyone forgets just how many B-29 bombers and F-86 fighters served with the RAF...

No need to play what-if, though it is fun; there are more than enough examples of WHEN.

FWIW, the B-29s were something of a failure in RAF service. Suffered from poor serviceability and were eventually returned to the US earlier than planned.
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Thanks for all the answers, didnt expect such quick responce.  ;D

Jets would be too slow to accelerate, however many jets towards the end of the war were proposed with reusable liquid rockets for assistance in taking off - so a hybrid rocket-jet with a large enough wing to allow landing at low speeds is a plausibility.

What about more powerfull catapults? A jet with low stall speeds could get airborne. AFAIK, Henschels Hs 132 was supposed to be an anti-shipping design at first, so it could be navalized if Kriegsmarine wanted so (correct me if I am wrong). It also had a pilot in the nose and in prone position = better visibility.

The most likely candidate to me would have been the Fw 190.

I get your point for this airplane up untill the point where later variants of F4U Corsairs would be leased to British carriers. From that point on, Wulfs would have a hard time.


Also I've seen mention of a  Blohm und Voss asymmetric design (P.62) as a "Marine-Stuka" but I have no idea if that was meant to be carrier-based or not.


Do you have any pictures of it, because I cant seem to find it on the internet.  :-\
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Designation Systems / Re: Junkers J-Series Designations
« Last post by hesham on Today at 05:50:50 am »
From Junkers-Projektbezeichnungen bis 1935
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I think the reason we all find this so satisfying to talk about is because of the nature of the British cancellations.

This forum draws its membership from all over the world and this thread draws its examples likewise. Why should the non-Brits among us be particularly drawn to the British experience?

Oh, and in answer to your own earlier question, FYI Armstrong Whitworth were gearing up to manufacture the Dunne safety aeroplane in 1914, when the First World War broke out. There is some discussion of that in the J W Dunne projects topic.
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70s studies were based on the paper version of the Tornado F.2. Engine and drag issues later revealed toned things down a bit.

Was a TF41 (Spey)  F-14 looked at? More thrust/better SFC than TF30 and commonality with F4K/M. DOAE studies I've seen at Kew don't seem to look at options, just vanilla F-14/F.2
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There was of course the Me 155 developed from the Me 109 that later became a high-altitude fighter and later given the Blohm und Voss to complete.
Also I've seen mention of a  Blohm und Voss asymmetric design (P.62) as a "Marine-Stuka" but I have no idea if that was meant to be carrier-based or not.

I guess the answer is the Graf Zeppelin would have used whatever aircraft the Luftwaffe would be willing to supply. Given their tendency to ignore the Navy's needs it may have been the carrier would have made do with whatever existing carrier-based types remained by 1944 or limited production of replacements, e.g. Me-109T based on the Me-109G and Ju-87C based on the Ju-87D/H series.
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Patent Pending / Re: George Miles concepts 1956
« Last post by Schneiderman on Yesterday at 11:35:47 pm »
Well its a patent, so deliberately short on specific details regarding load, range etc. The load-carrier component was to be of simple and cheap construction with short-life engines, maybe to include rockets.
As ORs by their very nature were confidential documents how widely would they have been circulated and discussed? F.G.Miles were a very small operation in the mid 1950s so would they have been included in those briefed on the OR? I know little about what they may have been involved in beyond the aircraft they built, Sparrowjet, Student and Aerovan, but were Fred and George well regarded at the cutting edge of design and likely to have been consulted?
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The most likely candidate to me would have been the Fw 190. The Graf Zeppelin could carry a rather limited
number of aircraft only, compared to other carriers. The fighter bomber versions of the Fw 190 probably still
were able to stand on their own feet (after dropping their load) and to be used as pure fighters in a naval
environment. The landing gear was considered to be tough and tests to carry torpedoes had been conducted, too.
And manufacturing was in full swing up to the end of the war. AFAIK after construction/completion of the GZ was
stopped, there was only one attempt to restart it around 1942. To me, this was the last point, that its completion
was something like "possible", because later allied air supremacy probably wouldn't have allowed for such a ship
to join the Kriegsmarine. Carriage of torpedoes was tested with the F-8 version, the F was brought into service in
1942, so it could have been on time.
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"For the RAF the F14 with Phoenix Skyflash and AIM 9l would have been a formidable
air defence asset fromv1978 to the 2000s A longer service life and possibly fewer
aircraft as well as earlier phase out of Phantoms would have helped the cost."


You'd also need more tankers and AEW support for F-14s than the F.3s. This was examined and dismissed in the mid 70s.

Chris
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Go back even further for an actual example - the P-51 was originally designed by North American to a British requirement, and if only they had put a Merlin in it from the start (even a high-blown single-stage), it might have done wonders earlier than it did. And everyone forgets just how many B-29 bombers and F-86 fighters served with the RAF...

No need to play what-if, though it is fun; there are more than enough examples of WHEN.
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