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Naval Projects / Mitsui LPD concept
« Last post by Triton on Today at 12:14:25 pm »
"MAST Asia 2017: Mitsui Unveils New LPD Amphibious Transport Dock Concept"
Published: Tuesday, 13 June 2017 14:12

Source:
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/naval-exhibitions/2017/mast-asia-2017-show-daily-news/5281-mast-asia-2017-mitsui-unveils-new-lpd-amphibious-transport-dock-concept.html

Quote
At MAST Asia 2017 (Maritime Air Systems & Technologies), the naval defense exhibition currently held in Tokyo, Japanese company Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (MES) unveiled a new Landing Platform Dock (LPD) concept.

Mitsui's LPD is designed for large scale transportation of LCACs, MBTs, vehicles, cargo and equipment, with multi-mission features. MES drew on its experience from constructing and delivering "Osumi" and "Shimokita" LPDs to the JMSDF when designing the new LPD.

Company representative didn't want to provide specific details, but based on a MES brochure the LPD has a deck with two helicopter spots and a hangar large enough to receive two V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft and a small size VTOL UAV (similar in size to the MQ-8B Fire Scout).

The LPD is fitted with a well deck large enough to accommodate two LCACs. Vehicles can be stored on two decks. Total vehicle capacity is classified, however, based on an image in the brochure, up to 40 vehicles (including AAVs, MBTs and APCs) may fit on the lower deck. The image might be conceptual so this figure may not be an accurate data.

In terms of systems, (based on the brochure) Mitsui's LPD is fitted with a Phalanx CIWS forward and a SeaRAM launcher on top of the helicopter hangar. There are two shafts and two rudders, as well as two bow thrusters. The hull form also features two retractable fin stabilizers.

The Japanese LPD concept measures 210 meters in length, 30 meters in width and 7 meters in draft for a displacement of 16,000 tons and a speed of 22 knots. The maximum complement of the vessel is 200 people (including troops). For comparison, the US Navy's San Antonio-class LPD displaces over 25,000 tons eventough it is roughly the same size (208 meters in length and 32 meters in width).

According to Mistui, the main missions of the LPD include island defense as well as humanitarian assistance / disaster relief.

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) is reportedly looking to boost its amphibious capabilities in order to protect its Southern Islands.
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Naval Projects / Mitsui MLP concept
« Last post by Triton on Today at 12:07:55 pm »
"MAST Asia 2017: Mitsui Unveils Japanese MLP Concept"

Source:
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/naval-exhibitions/2017/mast-asia-2017-show-daily-news/5272-mast-asia-2017-mitsui-unveils-japanese-mlp-concept.html

Quote
At MAST Asia 2017 (Maritime Air Systems & Technologies), the naval defense exhibition currently held in Tokyo, Japanese company Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (MES) unveiled its Mobile Landing Platform (MLP) concept.

Mitsui's MLP is designed for large scale transportation of LCACs, MBTs, vehicles, cargo and equipment, with multi-mission and modular features. In addition to its aviation operations and amphibious capabilities, this MLP can act as an offshore base.

The design differs from the American MLP which comes in two variants: The Expeditionary Transfer Dock (ESD) variant for amphibious operations and the Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) variant focusing on aircraft operation. Mitsui's design appers to combine both roles on a single design.

Unlike the ESB, there is no aviation hangar forward. There are four helicopter spots on the "almost" flat top. There is an elevator for stores and equipment next to spot #2. There is also a ramp allowing vehicles access between the two main decks.

The Japanese MLP concept measures 240 meters in length, 39 meters in width and 7 meters in draft for a displacement of 21,000 tons and a speed of 15 knots. The maximum complement of the vessel is 240 people.

According to Mistui, the main missions of the MLP include island defense as well as humanitarian assistance / disaster relief.

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) is reportedly looking to boost its amphibious capabilities in order to protect its Southern Islands. MES, which delivered "Osumi" and "Shimokita" LPDs to the JMSDF a few years ago, also unveiled a new LPD and a new LHD design at MAST Asia. Navy Recognition will be covering these designs soon.

MLP designs and the "sea basing" concept in general seems to be getting popular outside of the US. You may recall from our LIMA 2017 coverage that the Royal Malaysian Navy is also exploring (and using to some extend) this concept.
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Naval Projects / Mitsui LHD concept
« Last post by Triton on Today at 11:50:48 am »
"MAST Asia 2017: Mitsui Unveiled a New LHD Amphibious Assault Ship Concept"
Published: Wednesday, 21 June 2017 16:01

Source:
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/naval-exhibitions/2017/mast-asia-2017-show-daily-news/5302-mast-asia-2017-mitsui-unveiled-a-new-lhd-amphibious-assault-ship-concept.html

Quote
At MAST Asia 2017 (Maritime Air Systems & Technologies), the naval defense exhibition currently held last week in Tokyo, Japanese company Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding (MES) unveiled a new Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) concept.

Mitsui's LHD is designed for large scale transportation of LCACs, MBTs, vehicles, cargo and equipment, with multi-mission features. MES drew on its experience from constructing and delivering "Osumi" and "Shimokita" LPDs to the JMSDF when designing the new LHD.

Company representative didn't want to provide specific details, but based on the MES brochure, the LHD has a flat top with five helicopter spots and a hangar large enough to large helicopters such as the CH-47 Chinook tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopters.

The LHD is fitted with a well deck large enough to accommodate two LCACs. Vehicles can be stored on two decks. Total vehicle capacity is classified, however, based on an image in the brochure, at least 24 AAVs may fit on the lower deck. The image might be conceptual so this figure may not be an accurate data.

In terms of systems, (based on the brochure) Mitsui's LHD is fitted with a Phalanx CIWS forward and a SeaRAM launcher at the stern. There are two shafts and two rudders, as well as two bow thrusters. There is a main elevator for helicopters aft and a smaller one for stores and equipment forward, near the island.

The Japanese LHD concept measures 210 meters in length, 35 meters in width and 7 meters in draft for a displacement of 16,000 tons and a speed of 22 knots. The maximum complement of the vessel is 200 people (including troops). For comparison, the French Navy's Mistral-class LHD displaces over 20,000 tons eventough it is slightly smaller in size (199 meters in length and 32 meters in width).

According to Mistui, the main missions of the LHD include island defense as well as humanitarian assistance / disaster relief.

The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) is reportedly looking to boost its amphibious capabilities in order to protect its Southern Island.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Miles Aerovan variants?
« Last post by cluttonfred on Today at 11:25:14 am »
Early Miles designs generally had split flaps.  A few late WWII designs with STOL roles, notably the M.38 Messenger and the M.57 Aerovan, had permanent external slotted flaps.  As far as I know, none of the pre-war or WWII designs had retractable external airfoil flaps, so it may just be that the external flaps are not obvious in photos from certain angles.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Various Ekranoplane and WIG projects
« Last post by robertino on Today at 09:21:32 am »
Welcome aboard Robertino,

and that's new for me,what is its name and company ?.

thank you

I do not know, it is probably about Dragoljub Bešlin's project, the same one who has other interesting projects
http://www.vazduhoplovnetradicijesrbije.rs/index.php/biografije/65-dragoljub-beslin (serbian)
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Miles Aerovan variants?
« Last post by Avimimus on Today at 08:44:46 am »
Hello,

I was wondering if someone could explain the Miles airfoil flap to me?

A number of Miles designs appear to have flaps which are fixed below and behind the wing (similar to the Junkers style), with a gap/slot permanently exposed. However, some footage of the Miles Aerovan seems to show this flap retracted to be flush with the wing.

Is this correct or are my eyes deceiving me? How did these flaps work?
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Flying Cars And Roadable Aircraft
« Last post by Motocar on Today at 08:20:46 am »
I request your help, some friend of the subject will have the date of the publication in Popular Mechanics of 1959 of the article on the aircar of Mr. Trautman "Roadair"

Thank you in advance, Motocar
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: DC-8 Projects & Variants
« Last post by Jemiba on Today at 06:23:48 am »
Don't know about a DC 8 widebody airliner, but the D-890 certainly could be regarded as
a widebody version: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20056.0.html
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Naval Projects / Re: Royal Navy Type 26 Frigate
« Last post by DWG on Today at 06:06:58 am »
Are they retaining the "frigate" designation?  The size/weight of this ship is pretty close to a destroyer.

RN usage is destroyer=air defence, frigate=ASW. Weight growth means the old size equivalences don't always make sense. At 6500 tonnes, the Type 26 is the displacement of an 80s CGN, or a WWI ACR, while the Zumwalts are into WWI battleship range.
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