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1
The Bar / Re: Nuclear Weapons - Discussion.
« Last post by marauder2048 on Today at 04:11:03 pm »
https://www.defense.gov/News/Article/Article/1281946/stratcom-commander-describes-challenges-of-21st-century-deterrence/#.WZYu6kzeKkk.facebook

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"We can't [assume] that having 1,550 deployed strategic nuclear weapons under the New START Treaty somehow deters all our adversaries. It doesn't," the general said.

Why we should have decoupled our arsenal from that of the USSR/Russia after the Cold War and sized it for our and our allies security needs. Which IMHO was START I - 1200 launchers and 6000 warheads.

Have you read the article?
In context it's very clear he is not advocating for larger numbers of warheads and delivery systems.
He's advocating for modernisation of the triad and for the need for complementary capabilities (like cyber attack/ defence etc.)

1500 warheads was typically regarded as the lower limit of the quantity required to provide extended deterrence; the US is
according to the latest treaty compliance reports far below that.
2
USAF Picks Key Technologies For F-22 Follow-On


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LANGLEY AFB—The U.S. Air Force has identified the key technologies it needs to develop for a next-generation air superiority fighter that will replace the F-22 Raptor...
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The developing MQ-25A Stingray program offers another option for a possible BPI platform, although on a longer time horizon. The MQ-25A is the latest evolution of the Navy’s pursuit of a carrier-based, unmanned aircraft. While its primary stated role at this time is as an airborne tanker, additional capability is planned f or integration in the future. The Navy’s request-for-information at the inception of the program calls for a small, lightweight sensor similar to the MTS-B used on the Triton and Reaper. The MTS-B would provide the Stingray with the same sensor capability as the Reaper for supporting boost-phase engagements without modifying the program sensor requirements. Further, the aircraft should have sufficient payload to carry interceptors, given the platform's desired ability to carry sufficient fuel to refuel other platforms. Carrying interceptors, however, would require a specific design effort.  Incorporating the boost-phase kill capability on the Stingray also would allow basing of these capabilities on board aircraft carriers, giving greater operational freedom and utility.

Source:
https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2017-08/navy-boost-phase-could-counter-north-korea-part-three

Apologise for my language,  but the USN are now taking the absolute piss. Boost phase intercept? Anti ballistic missile shoot downs... and they want a dirt cheap barn door sized 'tanker' for that role.... this has to take the B2 and F22 debacle and add cherries to the 'you must be having a laugh'  cake.  They are seriously deranged.
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Quote
The developing MQ-25A Stingray program offers another option for a possible BPI platform, although on a longer time horizon. The MQ-25A is the latest evolution of the Navy’s pursuit of a carrier-based, unmanned aircraft. While its primary stated role at this time is as an airborne tanker, additional capability is planned f or integration in the future. The Navy’s request-for-information at the inception of the program calls for a small, lightweight sensor similar to the MTS-B used on the Triton and Reaper. The MTS-B would provide the Stingray with the same sensor capability as the Reaper for supporting boost-phase engagements without modifying the program sensor requirements. Further, the aircraft should have sufficient payload to carry interceptors, given the platform's desired ability to carry sufficient fuel to refuel other platforms. Carrying interceptors, however, would require a specific design effort.  Incorporating the boost-phase kill capability on the Stingray also would allow basing of these capabilities on board aircraft carriers, giving greater operational freedom and utility.

Source:
https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2017-08/navy-boost-phase-could-counter-north-korea-part-three
5
Aerospace / Re: Flying Mathematicians in WW1
« Last post by Dynoman on Today at 02:01:04 pm »
Great stories! I particularly liked the story of Edward Busk and the associated links to his past. Remarkable men whose contributions were significant to the British Royal Aircraft Factory and to the general knowledge of aviation. Thanks!
6
Aerospace / Re: General Atomics P46 'Avenger' UAV (Predator C)
« Last post by Flyaway on Today at 01:55:49 pm »
More on the story here.

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As General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) discloses the pursuit of a potential sale of 90 jet-powered Predator C Avengers to an undisclosed international customer, company executives are pushing the US government to clarify and relax export controls on unmanned air vehicles to non-NATO allies.

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The potential deal could be a breakthrough for the slow-burning Avenger programme, which until now, only acknowledged the US Air Force operated a technology demonstrator since a public unveiling in 2009. This week, GA-ASI officials disclosed up to seven aircraft deliveries to an unnamed US government agency.

But GA-ASI now faces potential barriers imposed by the international missile technology control regime (MTCR) agreement.

UAVs such as Avenger fall under MTCR’s Category I regulations, which are rarely licensed for export. In 2015, the Obama Administration adopted a policy that tightened export policy on UAVs to most non-NATO allies. The policy also required importers of American-built UAVs to comply with end-use monitoring by the US government as a condition of any sale.

As the Trump administration considers setting new MTCR export policies, GA-ASI chief executive Linden Blue urges the White House to make short-term changes, such as relaxing State Department-imposed policies on UAV exports.

“That allows the executive branch to use judgment on MTCR-related decisions,” he says. “Changing the MTCR, which is not a formal treaty, that will take longer and involve many countries.”

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Speaking on the possible international sale, GA-ASI president David Alexander touted the Avenger’s large sensor bay, which could carry a system equal in size to the United Technologies Aerospace Systems MS-177 multi-spectral sensor. GA-ASI’s main rival in the high performance UAV arena, Northrop Grumman, is testing the MS-177 on the RQ-4 to help bring the Global Hawk to parity with the USAF’s legacy U-2S Dragon Lady high-altitude manned reconnaissance aircraft.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/ga-asi-chasing-avenger-sale-to-international-custome-440385/
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