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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by gatoraptor on Yesterday at 06:49:11 pm »
Probably the closest U.S. magazine was the Wings/Airpower pair from Sentry.  Their long, in-depth articles (which sometimes took up an entire issue or even more) could be quite special, though the graphics were not as eye-catching as those in Air Enthusiast.  In fact, that's why I never subscribed, but preferred to buy individual issues off the newsstand; I have my favorites, and if nothing I particularly cared about was in a particular issue, I'd pass it by.  But invariably the next issue would be more to my liking.  I probably bought about 5-7 issues a year.

Incidentally, the use of two different names for alternate months was a clever ploy to keep two issues on the newsstand at any one time; as anyone who bought the magazine knows, it was really one monthly magazine, masquerading as two alternating bimonthlys!  I'm surprised that more magazines haven't used that idea since.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by lark on Yesterday at 02:21:43 pm »
The Air Enthusiast bi-monthly was one of the finest aircraft/aviation magazines ever produced.
It worked in the great tradition of Flying Review and Air Enthusiast monthly with many
great features about projects from Canada ,Australia,Sweden , the U.K and the U.S.
often written by Tony Buttler.
Collecting aviation mag's for more than fifty five years, I never saw an equivalent
not in the French market nor on the German or the U.S one...
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Books we would like to see reissued
« Last post by Pasoleati on Yesterday at 06:44:37 am »
By the way, the Jane's reprint "Jane's Fighting Aircraft  of  WW1" has some incredibly detailed info on some engines, even component metallurgical analysis!
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Books we would like to see reissued
« Last post by hesham on Yesterday at 05:43:29 am »
Hi,

I hope to saw again; Jane's Encyclopedia of Bombers again.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by hesham on Yesterday at 05:41:31 am »
Hi,

believe me,the Air Enthusiast failed for many reasons,as you mentioned some,the more
important thing was it focused on a partial of famous aircraft and Projects,also they
selected two main countries to speak about their popular weird designs only.

If I join them to write article every month (not bi-month),it will re-open with
great success,of course that is without any eagle from me.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Books we would like to see reissued
« Last post by Pasoleati on Yesterday at 05:29:51 am »
Not a reissue in the strictest sense: I would like to the equivalent of Jane's All the World Aircraft for WW1 and WW2 (separate books).
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Pasoleati on Yesterday at 05:21:51 am »
Who publishes "Aviation History"? Do U. S. mags still have the annoying habit of having a part of the article being detached from thr main part? E.g. the article has 4 pages on pages 20 - 23 and one half-page ending on page 69.
Air Enthusiast did that occasionally. Didn't stop me from buying it.

Very rarely AE did that. I think it was Soldier of Fortune in which the regulat column was on the last page and the final paragraph if that column was 10 pages before. And there were several articles fragmented that way in every issue. I have not seen anything like that in any Finnish magazine published for the last 30 years.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Books we would like to see reissued
« Last post by pathology_doc on Yesterday at 05:16:28 am »
The two favourite airplane books of my youth were Bill Gunston's Encyclopaedia of Combat Aircraft (from WW1 to the present day, i.e. 1977) and "Hitler's Luftwaffe", by Gunston and Tony Woods. I am nostalgically reminded of them now that my son is the same age as I was when I first discovered them.

The former is IMO deserving of an update and reissue, perhaps as "Gunston's Encylopaedia of Combat Aircraft from World War One to the Cold War", given what we now know about the true performance and history of these aircraft (especially the truth about the Soviet ones), and the fact that almost all the aircraft in it are now obsolete and their production and service histories are pretty much fully written. It was later split into three small handbooks in the same style which introduced a few extras (e.g. the Manchester) not covered in the original volume. As a broad-swath snapshot of military aviation's history, it still can't be beaten IMO despite the fact that time has exposed its deficiencies.

Much has also been done to uncover the true history surrounding some of the aircraft that flew for Nazi Germany, and both the operational history and technical sections of "Hitler's Luftwaffe" could be significantly expanded and revised.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by PaulMM (Overscan) on Yesterday at 01:07:50 am »
Who publishes "Aviation History"? Do U. S. mags still have the annoying habit of having a part of the article being detached from thr main part? E.g. the article has 4 pages on pages 20 - 23 and one half-page ending on page 69.
Air Enthusiast did that occasionally. Didn't stop me from buying it.

Magazines split articles very often, for the benefit of their advertisers. Its like those web articles split over lots of pages with ads on. The layout is designed to make you flick through the ad pages looking for the second part of your article.
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Bookshelf & Marketplace / Re: Aviation magazines English vs. French
« Last post by Jemiba on July 23, 2017, 11:39:27 pm »
Jemiba, I would expect those documents to be translated into English!

Of course that would be great ! And a version in French, too, and one for the Italian, Russian and maybe Japanese aviation fans.
But Pauls argument is still valid here : "Its simply economics ". And what would publishing a pure translation of such documents
be good for ? Allowing the readers to write a book without the bothersome task of translating original documents by themselves ?
Most readers want to get a summary and if the author proves, that it is based on original documents, that will probably improve credibility.
But browsing through stuff like a report about shifting the trim range of the tailplane on Thirsday, 29th July 1943 (in the LID issues about
the Arado 234) is interesting only for quite a few enthusiasts, even here, I'm sure.
The Luftfahrt Dokumente series (and to a large extend the Luftfahrt International series, too) mainly got along only with original
documents and more or less without editorial work. And its success on the market was very limited !
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