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Author Topic: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative  (Read 15410 times)

Offline XP67_Moonbat

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #30 on: December 11, 2010, 12:56:38 pm »
Small presentation on CST-100, with shiny graphics. Enjoy!

http://www.ispcs.com/files/tiny_mce/file_manager/presentations/reiley.pdf

plus an article with CG of the capsule atop various launchers.
http://onorbit.com/node/2509
« Last Edit: December 11, 2010, 01:33:45 pm by XP67_Moonbat »
In God we trust, all others we monitor. :-p

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #31 on: December 11, 2010, 01:49:20 pm »
NASA has now made public some of it's commercial crew requirements at http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/504982main_CCTSCR_Dec-08_Basic_Web.pdf.

They've clearly been following some of the recent debate:

Quote from: http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/new_space_enterprise/commercial/cctscr.html
Strategy of Documentation

NASA's overarching strategy for the development of these documents is to ensure that the requirements are not overly burdensome and allow our Commercial Partners the maximum flexibility to develop safe and cost effective human space transportation systems. The 1100-series of documents are in draft form now and, as mentioned in the previous section, we are planning on releasing the documents via an RFI in January and incorporating the feedback we receive from industry before we initially baseline those documents in the Spring 2011.

There are some communities that feel more requirements are appropriate; others feel fewer requirements are better. NASA is attempting to balance these competing interests into the development of a set of documents that will enable our Commercial Partners to apply innovative solutions while leveraging NASA's extensive experience with respect to safe human spaceflight. The current 1100-series incorporates input from NASA's three Technical Authorities (Safety and Mission Assurance, Chief Engineer, and Health and Medical), the International Space Station Program, the Space Shuttle Program, the Launch Services Program, and the Commercial Crew Planning Office. We have spent upwards of thousands of labor hours working through the requirements in order to strike the best balance.

It should be noted that a simplistic "page count" of the 1100-series of documents does not reflect the quality of the requirements or the degree of difficulty in meeting them. The majority of the pages in CCT-REQ-1130 International Space Station (ISS) Crew Transportation Certification and Services Requirements Document are made of up "rationale" and verifications that NASA added to the actual requirements in order for industry to see the "intent" of our requirements and give them the flexibility to meet the requirements in innovative ways. This is a direct result of industry feedback we received from the first RFI we put out last May.

In comparison to the documents used for early NASA human spaceflight programs, such as Gemini, it may appear that the set of requirements has dramatically expanded. In some ways, it has. However, at the time the Gemini requirements were developed, the United States had accomplished only about a half dozen human spaceflights. We now have 50 years and over 150 human missions of experience to leverage in order to enhance the safety and success of any future human space transportation program.

Another point of comparison is NASA's Launch Services Program (LSP). The LSP model was one of the inputs used by the Commercial Crew Planning Office in establishing its strategy for insight/oversight and safety. While the LSP model is excellent for its purposes, it has some clear distinctions from commercial crew that make wholesale adoption of the LSP approach to commercial crew unworkable. The primary difference is the LSP is not a development program, it is a services program. All the launch vehicles used by LSP were developed according to some standards and requirements, mostly Air Force and DOD requirements and standards.

However, the Air Force and DOD do not have "human" spaceflight requirements and standards. Only NASA has those and we have to make those requirements and standards available to the Commercial Providers to guide their design and development efforts. We are scrubbing those requirements to ensure they are truly necessary and we are allowing industry to substitute their standards in many instances. Successful spaceflight systems today use a pedigree of requirements and standards developed and adapted throughout spaceflight history.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2011, 01:46:10 pm »
Now that the 2011 budget is sorted, NASA has announced its CCDev2 awards:

Quote from: http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/apr/HQ_11-102_CCDev2.html
NASA Awards Next Set Of Commercial Crew Development Agreements

WASHINGTON -- NASA has awarded four Space Act Agreements in the second round of the agency's Commercial Crew Development (CCDev2) effort. Each company will receive between $22 million and $92.3 million to advance commercial crew space transportation system concepts and mature the design and development of elements of their systems, such as launch vehicles and spacecraft.

The selectees for CCDev2 awards are:
-- Blue Origin, Kent, Wash., $22 million
-- Sierra Nevada Corporation, Louisville, Colo., $80 million
-- Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), Hawthorne, Calif., $75 million
-- The Boeing Company, Houston, $92.3 million

"We're committed to safely transporting U.S. astronauts on American-made spacecraft and ending the outsourcing of this work to foreign governments," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. "These agreements are significant milestones in NASA's plans to take advantage of American ingenuity to get to low-Earth orbit, so we can concentrate our resources on deep space exploration."

The goal of CCDev2 is to accelerate the availability of U.S. commercial crew transportation capabilities and reduce the gap in American human spaceflight capability. Through this activity, NASA also may be able to spur economic growth as potential new space markets are created.

Once developed, crew transportation capabilities could become available to commercial and government customers.

"The next American-flagged vehicle to carry our astronauts into space is going to be a U.S. commercial provider, [my emphasis]" said Ed Mango, NASA's Commercial Crew Program manager. "The partnerships NASA is forming with industry will support the development of multiple American systems capable of providing future access to low-Earth orbit."

These awards are a continuation of NASA's CCDev initiatives, which began in 2009 to stimulate efforts within U.S. industry to develop and demonstrate human spaceflight capabilities. For more information about NASA's Commercial Crew Program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2011, 05:53:28 am »
Via Slashdot: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1381&doc_id=233226


Diagram from Blue Origin patent application 20110017872, "Sea Landing of Space Launch Vehicles
and Associated Systems and Methods."




The two-stage rocket from Blue Origin patent application 20100326045, "Multiple-Use Rocket Engines
and Associated Systems and Methods."




One of the recoverable engines from Blue Origin patent application 20100326045, "Multiple-Use Rocket Engines and Associated Systems and Methods."

[IMAGE CREDITS: DesignNews]
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Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2011, 06:16:42 am »
A BBC story from last month: Boeing pilots to make space trip


The CST-100 is Boeing's answer to Nasa's call for a commercial crew transport service

[IMAGE CREDIT: BBC News]
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Offline Triton

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #35 on: June 30, 2014, 08:17:30 pm »

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #36 on: August 06, 2015, 02:14:55 pm »
http://thehill.com/policy/finance/250322-nasa-signing-490m-contract-with-russia

This maneuver by Bolden could backfire on NASA, big time.
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Offline flanker

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #37 on: August 06, 2015, 02:18:38 pm »
How is this a "maneuver"? They have been forced to buy more Soyuz seats because Congress has frankly been a bunch of retards.
Push the envelope,watch it bend.

Offline Moose

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #38 on: August 06, 2015, 11:31:51 pm »
Yeah, Grey, I'm not seeing where you're going with your comment. Bolden has been consistent on this for years now, and has already had to buy more Soyuz seats after the underfunding of CCDev slipped the program's flights from this year to 2017. If anything he was too low profile about it last time, because funding continued to get stripped from the program afterward with only minimal public scrutiny.

Additionally, as Bolden points out in his statement, the proposed funding levels would already effectively put the program on ice for a year. So there's not much room for a backlash. About the only way it could get worse is if the Congressional Republicans zero out funding entirely, which they are pretty unlikely to do.

Offline Grey Havoc

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Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2016, 04:01:15 am »
Via Spacedaily, a joint press release from ULA & Boeing: United Launch Alliance and the Boeing Company Unveil the Atlas V Configuration for the CST-100 Starliner Crew Capsule


Quote
This new configuration incorporates an aeroskirt aft of the spacecraft, extending the Starliner Service Module cylindrical surface to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of the integrated launch configuration and bring loads margins back to acceptable flight levels.

"Through incredible coordination and continued innovative thinking, the collective team of NASA, Boeing and United Launch Alliance completed three wind tunnel tests in six months to investigate the aerodynamic stability of various configurations and to anchor our analytical predictions. Based on that information, we updated the configuration for the Atlas V Starliner integrated vehicle stack," said Gary Wentz, ULA vice president of Human and Commercial Services. "This configuration is unique because it combines the Atlas V launch vehicle without a payload fairing with Boeing's Starliner capsule, resulting in different aerodynamic interactions." 

The aeroskirt is a metallic orthogrid structure designed to be jettisoned for improved performance. In the unlikely event that an emergency occurs during boost phase of flight, the aeroskirt has venting provisions to control over-pressurization if the Starliner's abort engines are fired. Fabrication of the aeroskirt is scheduled to begin this month at ULA's factory in Decatur, Alabama, following completion of a Production Readiness Review.

"Our testing indicates the solution we chose will sufficiently smooth the air flow around the vehicle during ascent, ensuring crew safety and mission success," said John Mulholland, vice president and program manager of Boeing's Commercial Crew Program.

The ULA team completed the aeroskirt Preliminary Design Review earlier this month. The Atlas V with Starliner has a planned uncrewed flight test in 2018 with operational missions to follow.
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Offline Grey Havoc

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Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2017, 07:19:24 am »

Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #44 on: April 03, 2017, 09:02:35 am »