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Author Topic: Ricci Bros Projects: between the aerial motorcycle and the flying transatlantic  (Read 8264 times)

Offline ermeio

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Something about the ricci brothers:
Umberto Ricci, born in Verona on November 26,  1886
Ettore Ricci, born in Verona on November 30,  1888:

they started their aeronautical career in 1905, building little hot air rigid airship models.
After some free flight gliders, they built a triple-tandem hydroplane in 1912 - Ricci 0
powered by an inline  Daimler 6 cyl engine. This aircraft flew in 1914
During the first World War they built a three engine biplane twin fuselage seaplane.
This one wass built in Naples and was intended to carry two torpedoes - The fuselages are very similar to the FBA flying Boats, built under license by the same firm.
The engines were two Isotta Fraschini V4 and a center line mounted Fiat A 12 bis.Wingspan: 28 metres
lenght 14 mt the seaplane went lost during her first flight.
The second prototype flew in 1919.
During 1918 the ricci brothers also designed a large gull-wing seaplane with a pylon mounted engine: the aircraft was intended to leverage the ground effect flying at low altitude to deliver its payload (2 torpedoes, buried inside the fuselage)
After the war the prototype was converted into a 10 seat passenger aircraft.
following the Ricci 3,  4 and 5 were the prelude to transatlantic flying boats, the latter intended to carry 150 passengers between Naples and New-York.
These projects did not gain financial support.
The little Ricci triplane (only 3,45 mt wingspan) was designed during the war, but it was built only in 1918.
The diminutive aircraft was entered in a popular aviation contest for an aerial motorcycle with a wingspan under six meters.
The contest was held in july 1919 and placed third, after the Macchi M16 and the Pensuti triplane.
The aircraftwas named Ricci R6 and a two place version - Ricci 9 - was developed in 1921.
During 1921 the Ricci brothers started the construction of a large airship: the Ricci-Vaugean-Gargiulo A.V.3, intended to carry 100 passengers: lenght 120 mt; diameter: 33 mt. The project never flew.
In the followin years the firm built some motor boats and some FBA flying boats for the Grece.
They also designed a beating-wing hydro and a little folding wing catapultable fighter to be carried inside a submarine.
The ricci R6 gained new interest in the following years, to be used in the colonies.A newly built example was purchased by the Regia Aeronautica and allotted the MM.167.
After the second world war the busy brothers designed some interesting VTOLs and a giant transatlantic 350 tons aircraft, with a two decks fuselage and ten tubular wings.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2010, 01:19:49 pm by ermeio »

Offline Skybolt

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One can add that the Ricci's diminutive triplane is hanging from the roof of the Aeronautical Pavillon of Museo della Scienza e della Tecnologia in Milan....

Offline hesham

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By the way,

the Ricci R.1 was also called R.I.B.

Offline Tophe

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Something about the ricci brothers:
During the first World War they built a three engine biplane twin fuselage seaplane.
This one wass built in Naples and was intended to carry two torpedoes - The fuselages are very similar to the FBA flying Boats, built under license by the same firm.
The engines were two Isotta Fraschini V4 and a center line mounted Fiat A 12 bis.Wingspan: 28 metres
lenght 14 mt the seaplane went lost during her first flight.
The second prototype flew in 1919.
Google found not twin twin-hull Ricci seaplane. I have looked in my twin-boom database, and I am not sure the one I have is the same:from Jane's all the World aircraft 1919, I have the SIAM Ricci (Societa Industrie Alto Mediterraneo). 2 versions: tractive single engine (700hp), pusher twin-engine. Is this what you were talking about? You seem to speak of a 3-engined layout...

Offline hesham

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Offline Tophe

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Thanks for this confirmation about a 3-engined layout.
From the JAWA 1919, reduced, I confirm the 1-engined and 2-engined versions:

Offline ermeio

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Yes, this is the Ricci R1: as you can see, the hulls are very reminiscent of the FBA fuselage.
The first prototype went lost during the maiden flight and was rebuilt in the following years.
I suspect that the one in flight magazine is the second prototype.
In the flight caption the aircraft is reported as three engined - the discerning eye can distinguish the two pusher engines (above the hulls) and the single tractive airscrew mounted in front of the center line fuselage, suspended between the wings.
the engines were two  200 hp IF and a single 300hp IF - no single engine was capable of 700 hp before the late '20s.
best regards
« Last Edit: February 02, 2010, 01:32:36 pm by ermeio »

Offline Maveric

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Hi ermeio,

do you have drawings and technical info´s for the Ricci projects?

Servus
I see you on the dark side of the moon.

Offline Tophe

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the engines were two  200 hp IF and a single 300hp IF - no single engine was capable of 700 hp before the late '20s.
Thanks for this expert analysis. So... the first Jane's picture would be a 3-engined total 700hp seaplane, but what about the one mentionned as "twin-engine"? Misreading of Jane's writer? ??? ;)

Offline Maveric

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...there is the Ricci R.5 from 1923 build by the Officine E. Cantieri Montofano...

(Source: JAWA 1923)

Maveric
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Offline Maveric

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...and the Ricci R.7 trainer, also build by Montofano in 1923...

(same Source)

Maveric
I see you on the dark side of the moon.

Offline ermeio

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Thanks for this expert analysis. So... the first Jane's picture would be a 3-engined total 700hp seaplane, but what about the one mentionned as "twin-engine"? Misreading of Jane's writer? ??? ;)
[/quote]

Hi, Thophe
the Ricci's are obscure aircraft, also for an Italian, let alone for an english jane's correspondant in 1920.
The tho photos are side and rearward views of the same aircraft, and that engine installation in the fuselage nose is very difficult to be seen from  behind - well, you can see that also in the side view there is some problem to discern the side nacelle and the props may look like struts...
I checked again the books I have at hand and the photos are of a three-engine biplane.
A very peculiar feature are the three coloured rudders, with horizontal stripes instead of the mandatory vertical stripes.
Also lacking is the savoia coat of arms.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 01:52:14 pm by ermeio »

Offline Tophe

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Thanks for this final jugement: three-engine R1, all right.
When you wrote triplane, did you mistype for three-engine? or refer to the R6?
Thanks anyway. ;D

Offline hesham

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From l'Aeronautique journal,


what was this Ricci aircraft or project ?.


Also I hope to know what was those mysteries aircraft;
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,1108.msg8930.html#msg8930

Offline covert_shores

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Photos and specs of Ricci R-6 Triplane from 1918 (the aircraft hanging from the ceiling is a replica).




COVERT SHORES: www.hisutton.com