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Author Topic: Super Ikara  (Read 24645 times)

Online Anderman

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #45 on: March 23, 2017, 01:07:15 pm »
A former colleague of mine was the Super Ikara Project Manager at cancellation in the early/ mid 80s and we briefly discussed it a few years back.

From memory:
It was canister launched with folding wings


Not sure if it is Super Ikara but this is a picture of a Ikara launched from a canister


Offline Abraham Gubler

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #46 on: March 23, 2017, 08:27:19 pm »
That is BOXIK as in BOX launched IKara. It is the basic rocket powered ASW Ikara but with folding wings and storable components.
"There is a tendency in our planning to confuse the unfamiliar with the improbable." Thomas Schelling

Offline carvalho2008

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2017, 02:44:07 pm »
fill years ago, i designed one weapon based Ikara project for one  UCAV.

based for NSFS operations or saturation

 https://projetosalternativosnavais.wordpress.com/2016/01/19/ucav-anfibio-ataques-de-saturacao/

maybe this is a perspective of actual design if continue to be developed

Offline carvalho2008

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Offline Hood

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #49 on: March 30, 2017, 07:36:30 am »
Further to my answer to Kugelblitz's question, the RAN River class magazine I think held around 26 missiles, so was slightly more capacious than the RN magazines.
One reason the magazines were different was because the RAN had stowed the missiles in rows in the magazine and the RN were worried if a rocket booster accidently ignited that it would set off the missile behind it and cause a series of secondary explosions. On the other hand the magazine was topside so better vented if it did blow whereas the RN planned its magazines to be in the hull.

Offline Pioneer

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #50 on: April 21, 2017, 04:04:23 am »
Sorry gents, I'm late to this subject.
The Super Ikara that's being discussed here, would it be the M7 Ikara Program:
The M7 Ikara was proposed as a box-launched version of its predecessor, the M3 Ikara, a rocket launched anti-submarine guided missile carrying a Mk46 Torpedo. The new Ikara was to have a digital autopilot and revamped avionics suite.

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Pioneer
And remember…remember the glory is not the exhortation of war, but the exhortation of man.
Mans nobility, made transcendent in the fiery crucible of war.
Faithfulness and fortitude.
Gentleness and compassion.
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Offline Hood

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #51 on: April 21, 2017, 06:46:40 am »
I have also seen a reference in Warship 2015 in an article on postwar RN weapons by John Jordan that the M7 was an air-breather and was the starting point of the Turana drone. He also mentions the M6 which was designed for Stingray. This is probably the closest match to what the Commons Defence Expenditure Committee was calling Super Ikara. Though its perhaps possible there was a further development adding the turbojet of M7 with the Stingray capability of M6.

Offline JFC Fuller

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Re: Super Ikara
« Reply #52 on: April 21, 2017, 07:00:25 am »
I agree, Ikara M6 seems the most likely candidate for the UK "Stretched Ikara" cancelled in 1977. The fragmentary evidence suggests modification to take Stingray and a new rocket motor to improve the range.

A bit of googling suggests the M7 was a later programme, apparently underway in 1984 and BAe were involved.