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Author Topic: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)  (Read 68769 times)

Offline flateric

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National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« on: April 26, 2006, 03:07:35 am »
Thread to discuss configurations of National AeroSpace Plane (X-30) from various contractors.

General Dynamics proporsal graphics.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 03:03:42 am by flateric »
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Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2006, 01:47:25 pm »
Marquardt NASP promo (Marquardt wasn't a contender in NASP gameplay)
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 12:23:26 pm by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2006, 01:52:38 pm »
Rocketdyne NASP proporsal
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 02:36:43 am by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2006, 02:00:08 pm »
Rockwell International NASP
« Last Edit: April 26, 2006, 02:06:07 pm by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
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Online Meteorit

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2006, 09:50:18 am »
Nice. Anymore pictures of different companies proposals anyone? As far as I know NASP contractors included Boeing, Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, General Dynamics and Rockwell, with Pratt & Whitney and General Electric for propulsion research, and Rocketdyne later contributing to NASP under its own funding. I wasn't aware of Marquardt also participating.

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2006, 11:53:10 am »
Boeing NASP proporsal
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 02:42:06 am by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2006, 11:57:26 am »
McDonnell Douglas NASP proporsal
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline Orionblamblam

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2006, 08:41:26 am »
Scott, don't you have any info on 'right' stuff?

I have annoyingly little hard data on NASP designs, and most of the good stuff I have isn't for public consumption. NASP remains *tightly* controlled and classified. Sadly, a lot of pre-NASP artwork got recycled by the various firms during the NASP days, and a lot of hypersonic transport ("Orient Express") artwork was called NASP. Most of the McD art you show is actually of an HST, not NASP... though the clearly orbital vehicles are shown to have the exact same geometry. NASP then as now was very classified, and non-NASP designs were cranked out for the public. The companies had to show *something.*

An interesting note: The McD designs you show are clearly in the lineage of the X-43 "Hyper-X." Compare the vertical stabilizers and small wings with those of the X-43... they're much the same. The main difference is with the nose; the X-43 has a wide "spatula" nose to capture more air for the engine. And even here, the X-43 is not a unique design; it is a greatly scaled-down version of a Mach 10 recon/strike vehicle derived from NASP work. This McDonnell-Douglas "Phantom Works" project dated from the extremely late 1980's to the late 90's, and might still be alive to some degree.

I was going to direct you to the drawings on my "bomber projects" page since I created 4-views of the Mach 10 cruiser some months ago; but it seems that I haven't updated that page in rather a long time.
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Offline Sentinel Chicken

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2006, 09:25:15 am »
I have annoyingly little hard data on NASP designs, and most of the good stuff I have isn't for public consumption. NASP remains *tightly* controlled and classified.
Oh, he could tell you, but then he'd have to kill you. :D

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2006, 10:18:59 am »
'As leader of the X-30 National Aerospace Plane team, he well remembers the day that designers decided to experiment with a spatula-shaped fuselage design-now used in most Boeing hypersonic concepts-that was better suited for horizontal flight.

"This was unlike any hypersonic configuration ever conceived," he said. The craft featured a nose like a spatula, sharp leading edges, a highly non-circular body cross-section, and tails like a fighter aircraft. Only a month had been spent on developing what was called the Non-Circular Body, Krieger noted.

"Those of us in the control room who were part of the National AeroSpace Plane team couldn't have been more proud when the X-43A made its first successful flight," he said. "As well as technical achievement, the X-43 symbolizes a determination to think way outside of the box, to leave behind a traditional concept and come up with a breakthrough design." '

*- Bob Krieger, president of Boeing Phantom Works

Boeing Frontiers Online
http://www.boeing.com/news/frontiers/archive/2004/july/ts_sf8a.html
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 10:23:00 am by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline Orionblamblam

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2006, 10:52:50 am »

"This was unlike any hypersonic configuration ever conceived," he said. The craft featured a nose like a spatula, sharp leading edges, a highly non-circular body cross-section, and tails like a fighter aircraft.


Errr.... the "unlike any hypersonic configuration ever conceived" is plain wrong. Spatular noses for hypersonic designs have been around since at least the early '60's, and the zealous followers of Vincent Burnelli would like to sue the bejeebers out of Boeing for "stealling" the Burnelli GB888 configuration.

http://www.mysteriesofcanada.com/Canada/Canada_Car/burnelli_designs.htm
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Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2006, 11:27:22 am »
So-called 'converged' design appeared on 10/29/90 AW&ST cover
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 12:25:18 pm by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2006, 11:31:16 am »
Several months later nose on public pictures became flattened from a blunt cone to a rounded edge wedge, but the rest of the design was consistent with the 10/29/90 AW&ST cover
« Last Edit: April 28, 2006, 11:47:11 am by flateric »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2006, 11:59:06 am »
March 1991 NASA Langley photos of NASP Test Technique Demonstrator.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2010, 05:02:44 pm by overscan »
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works

Offline flateric

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Re: National AeroSpace Plane (X-30)
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2006, 12:10:55 pm »
NASA Langley, TDT Tunnell, November 1992 - NASP model is mutating again (if that really NASP-related).
Interesting, that later ARSLS (Advanced Reusable Small Launch System) craft looks pretty close to wind tunnel model.
"There are many disbelievers in
stealth, more than a few of them truly technically ignorant and proud of it." Sherm Mullin, Skunk Works