Register here

Author Topic: Skylon Spaceplane  (Read 74262 times)

Offline mz

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 681
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2010, 02:24:50 am »
EDIT: Oh found already some spreadsheet materials on their homepage so my questions have been partly answered at least.
http://www.reactionengines.co.uk/pdf_documents.html
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 02:28:57 am by mz »

Offline SteveO

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 311
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #31 on: October 06, 2010, 11:23:00 am »
I had a looong talk with the Reaction Engines representatives, a very usefull one, so when I will have some free time to spare, I will write some extract of it.
Thanks Matej, will look forward to it.

Nice pic of the SABRE, lots to get right and lots that can go wrong there!

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 589
Conceptual space station serviced by Skylon
« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2010, 02:06:16 pm »
Here's a nice piece of concept art that I can't resist sharing!



You can download a fairly high-res version from the artist's (fugimel) web page at http://feguimel.deviantart.com/art/Comm-CLARKE-SpaceStation-186411464?fullview=1. There's a little bit of background to it in this rocketeers blog posting.

Offline Nik

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 382
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #33 on: November 22, 2010, 05:34:32 am »
Oh, wow ! That's a blast from the Golden Age of rocketry !!

FWIW, I think the station should be a polygonal toroid so that segments would lack compound curves and *would* fit in cargo bay...

Offline Michel Van

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 3537
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #34 on: November 22, 2010, 06:33:31 am »
Oh, wow ! That's a blast from the Golden Age of rocketry !!

FWIW, I think the station should be a polygonal toroid so that segments would lack compound curves and *would* fit in cargo bay...

that is inflatable toroid segments (see concept art)
I love Strange Technology

Offline OM

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 753
    • OMBlog
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #35 on: November 22, 2010, 07:38:14 pm »
FWIW, I think the station should be a polygonal toroid so that segments would lack compound curves and *would* fit in cargo bay...

...There have been concepts that allow for compound curves in structures that can be fit in a conventional cylindrical cargo shroud/bay. They involve stacking smaller segments rotated 180 degrees from each other, thus aligning them along one axis as a cylinder. When orbit has been achieved, the whole stack is removed, the segments rotated, and as much as a 1/4 arc of a complete toroid results. Note that a 1/4 arc required a serious lift booster, and the more conservative concepts I've read about called for arcs of only 1/6 or 1/8.

Wish I still had those papers that discussed these concepts. The diagrams were actually quite detailed in the stacking and deployment phase.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 589
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #36 on: April 18, 2011, 03:15:38 pm »
Reaction Engines have a key test of their precooler technology coming up in June. But what I find most interesting about the following report is the claim that they have $350M worth of funding lined-up contingent on the precooler working!

Quote from: http://www.space.com/11414-skylon-space-plane-british-engine-test.html
Big Test Looms for British Space Plane Concept

SAN FRANCISCO A huge, unmanned British space plane is on pace to start launching payloads into Earth orbit in less than a decade provided it can pass a crucial engine test in June, its designers say.

[...]

The atmospheric air whooshing into the SABRE engines at high speeds would be extremely hot. But for the engines to work efficiently during the air-breathing stage, that air needs to be cooled substantially down to about minus 238 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 150 degrees Celsius) before being compressed and reacted with the onboard hydrogen.

That's what the big test in June is for. Skylon engineers have developed a new "precooler" system to do the job. The system will get its first big test in the June trials.

If the precooler works, investors will chip in another $350 million, helping take the Skylon project to another level of development. That next phase would likely see vehicle design completion and a full engine demonstration by 2014

Offline Nik

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 382
Skylon Spaceplane pre-cooler
« Reply #37 on: April 20, 2011, 07:22:20 am »
IIRC, *if* the pre-cooler works, then they'll license it to Euro-consortium who want to build an antipodal Mach-5 jet liner aka 'Lapcat'. No rockets, pure air-breathing, but Europe to Australia in five (5) hours flat...

The cash-flow from that bootstraps Skylon development, first just air-breathing to Mach 5 for heat-soak and structural / handling / control stuff, then upgrade to full SABRE engines and push envelope towards orbit...

Sounds like a plan...

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • ***
  • Posts: 589
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #38 on: April 20, 2011, 07:31:48 am »
I thought Lapcat was just an EU funded study, not something that would ever be built! Who's putting up the billions required to fund development?!

Offline CNH

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 205
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #39 on: April 20, 2011, 04:04:17 pm »
Europe to Australia in 5 hours? ROFL. Who wants to go to Australia any way? [Maybe some would like to come back ...] Seriously, there are what ... 20 million people in Oz? Not exactly a mass market.

As for Mach 5 and the rest - has no one learned anything from Concorde? Supersonic flight over land is a big no no.

Offline Nik

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 382
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #40 on: April 20, 2011, 05:05:58 pm »
My understanding is that they would fly a lot higher than Concorde, so the boom is reduced. Besides, if you don't need to stop in Middle East to refuel...

Offline RLBH

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 160
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #41 on: April 20, 2011, 11:35:57 pm »
Actually, I believe their proposed route passes over the Arctic ocean, through the Bering straits and over the Pacific ocean. Technically, this is actually a westerly route to Australia, and a return flight up the Red and Adriatic Seas would allow you to go supersonic most of the way, whilst making the combined round trip count as a circumnavigation.

Offline shockonlip

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 605
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2011, 12:16:01 am »
Europe to Australia in 5 hours? ROFL. Who wants to go to Australia any way? [Maybe some would like to come back ...] Seriously, there are what ... 20 million people in Oz? Not exactly a mass market.

As for Mach 5 and the rest - has no one learned anything from Concorde? Supersonic flight over land is a big no no.

Haven't you heard? You don't have to go to Australia !

The Australians will come to the UK, and park their scramjets at Heathrow !

Last week at the 2011 Spaceplanes Conference in San Fransicso, they presented 3 papers on the next phase
of their 20 year development roadmap using scramjets and rockets for access to space entitled SCRAMSPACE
"(Scramjet-based Access-to-Space Systems) an Australian Space Research Program funded
project that represents the first phase of this road map. SCRAMSPACE is centred around an affordable, expertise
building flight at the scramjet entry point to the access-to-space Mach range (M8-M12). The flight will address
scramjet performance, materials, and instrumentation, supported by ground-based performance and vehicle control
developments in this range. Future phases of the road map will progressively incorporate scramjet technologies,
currently being developed in Australian hypersonics laboratories, into flight experiments of increasing speed and
sophistication. Ultimately, scramjet and rocket technologies will be brought together to demonstrate a prototype
hybrid rocket / scramjet access-to-space system".

Offline Michel Van

  • Senior Member
  • CLEARANCE: Top Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 3537
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2011, 01:32:12 am »
Europe to Australia in 5 hours? ROFL. Who wants to go to Australia any way? [Maybe some would like to come back ...] Seriously, there are what ... 20 million people in Oz? Not exactly a mass market.

As for Mach 5 and the rest - has no one learned anything from Concorde? Supersonic flight over land is a big no no.

I wanna visit Oz, (but entry permit and customs inspection are hell)
there other market for Mach 5, like route like China/ Japan  to USA or Europe
Skylon precursor BAe HOTOL was also proposed as hypersonic passenger craft !
50 persons form London to Sydney in 45 Minute
with engine boostphase almost to orbit, then glide to Airport like Space shuttle
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,277.msg93538.html#msg93538


I love Strange Technology

Offline CNH

  • CLEARANCE: Secret
  • **
  • Posts: 205
Re: Skylon Spaceplane
« Reply #44 on: April 25, 2011, 08:47:24 am »
The boom may be reduced, but it'll still be there. So it leaves Heathrow - where is it when it hits Mach 1?