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Author Topic: Renard Aircraft Designations (Belgium - including R.S.V. & Stampe et Renard)  (Read 5133 times)

Offline Cy-27

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Alfred Renard built a number of aircraft, mostly before the start of World War II.
 
Alfred started on the ACAZ T-2 but his early substantial design input was at Société Anonyme Belge de Constructions Aéronautiques (S.A.B.C.A.) before joining forces with Stampe and Vertongen. His main work for S.A.B.C.A. was on the Epervier parasol design.
 
This period saw the emergence of Renard-Stampe-Vertongen (R.S.V.) in 1922. During this period sub-types were usually identified by a numerical suffix which denoted the engine capacity (ie RSV.26/140 - 140 hp version of the RSV Model 26.
 
In 1925, along with his brother Georges, they started an aero-engine company while Alfred was working with R.S.V.
 
In the 1927 Renard Constructions Aéronautiques started and carried on to the start of World War II.
 
Post war saw development with developments of the SNCAN SV-4 range as Stampe et Renard (SNCAN). The firm built 65 SV-4B for the Belgiam military and worked on the development design and support for the highly successful SV-4C design.
 
Stampe et Renard also continued with their own maintainance work through to the 1970's.
 
Identified types are listed below, grouped by organisation.
 
Société Anonyme Belge de Constructions Aéronautiques
 
SABCA 2 Monoplane 1928

Epervier (SABCA 2bis) Parasol monoplane built to replace the earlier destroyed SABCA 2. Prototype single-seat all metal fighter monoplane buit by the Renard brothers for a government design contest in 1928 with a Gnome-Rhone air-cooled 480 hp engine. 1928
 

Offline Cy-27

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Renard-Stampe-Vertongen (R.S.V.)

RSV.18/100 Biplane two seater that first flew in the autumn of 1928 as O-BRSV. Built under license in the USA by Gates Corporation under the Gates-RSV name. Fitted with a 100 hp Renard engine. 1928

RSV.18/105 OO-APC was the first high-wing Renard aeroplane to have a Cirrus Hermes engine. 1929

RSV.20/100 A high-wing single-seat monoplane with a Hispano-Suiza engine. Not completed, remained a project only. 1928

RSV.20/100 Minerva III Project for a Renard 100 hp machine. 1928

RSV.22/100 Aerobatic biplane project

RSV.22/180 Biplane with Hispano-Suiza 180 hp engine. 1928

RSV.22/200 Re-engined RSV.22/180 with a Renard 9-cylinder engine. Primary target user was the Belgian Air Force 1931

RSV.22/215 Converted from RSV.22/180 anf fitted with an Armstrong-Whitworth Lynx 215 hp powerplant. 1932

RSV.22/230 Known as the Titan, powered by a Gnome-Rhone 230 hp engine. Built by SABCA as a two seater with a scarf-ring for gunner in the rear cockpit. Gnome-Rhone 230 hp engine. 1929
Renard-Stampe-Vertongen (R.S.V.) RSV.22/300 Project only for biplane fighter with Renard 22m3 300 hp motor. 1927
 

Offline Cy-27

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Renard-Stampe-Vertongen (R.S.V.)
RSV.23/180 Twin seat biplane. Also referred to as the  RSV.22. Twenty-three built. Fitted with lateral (side) radiators. Fuselage constructed with wood. 1926

RSV.26 Amphibian Converted from a RSV.26/180. 1927

RSV.26/100 Biplane two-seater. Built under license in the USA by Gates Corporation under the Gates-RSV name. First example was O-BAJK. 1928

RSV.26/140 Derived from the RSV.32/90 training aircraft in the mid 1920's, fitted with  Minerva 140 hp engine. 1924

RSV.26/180 A biplane design which first flew in 1927.

RSV.26/180 Minerva I Two seat biplane with Hispano-Suiza engine. 1926

RSV.26/180 Minerva II Two seat biplane with Hispano-Suiza 140 hp engine. 1929
Renard-Stampe-Vertongen (R.S.V.) RSV.26/180 Minerva III Two seat biplane for military use. 1932

RSV.26/215 Powered by a Armstrong-Siddeley Lynx 215 hp radial engine. 1930

RSV.28/180 Powered by a Hispano-Suiza 180 hp engine. Based on the earlier RSV.26/180 MkIII. 1930

RSV.32 Biplane built in many different variants

RSV.32/110 Amphibian A project to fit out an RSV.32 with amphibious landing gear and a 110 hp Renard engine. Not built.

RSV.32/100 Variant with Renard 100 hp engine. Prototype was O-BOEL, eight built including O-BAJF. 1923

RSV.32/105 One-off variant with Hermes 105 hp engine. 

RSV.32/110 Variant with Lorraine 110 hp engine. Around nineteen completed, mainly for the Bellgian Air Force. 1929

RSV.32/120 Two examples were built of this version with a 120 hp renard engine. An example was OO-APW. 1935

RSV.32/130 Fitted with a 130 hp Walter engine. At least one example flew.

RSV.32/2x2 A RSV.32 with a fuselage conversion to provide 2+2 seating. Three examples were converted from a RSV.32/100 and two RSV.32/120.

RSV.32/90 Trainer variant with Anzani 10C 90 hp engine. At least nine completed. 1923

RSV.32/GII Variation of the RSV.32 with a de Havilland Gipsy engine.  Single example built, OO-AMP, extra cabane struts to reduce the wire bracing required and make the front cockpit more accessible. 1930

 

Offline Cy-27

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Renard Constructions Aéronautiques 
R-16 Three seat tourer. A high-wing monoplane with a Renard 100 hp engine registered OO-AKJ. 1928

R-17 Four seat cabin monoplane. Designed and built as a high-speed high-wing cantilever transport. The cantilever wing had an unusual feature in that at that time, most high-wing monoplanes still had braced wings, the R-17 did not. Designed for the carriage of fresh flowers, no orders were received and so the type was retained by the company until 1946. Powered by a single 100 hp Renard engine, serial OO-ALV. Tubular construction. 1931

R-18 Similar to the RSV.18-100, a single engine monoplane two seater with a 100 hp Renard engine. 

R-30 Prototype trimotor passenger airliner built in Belgium in 1931 as OO-AMK. Strut braced high-wing monoplane of a conventional design with a fully enclosed flight deck and separate passenger cabin. Three Renard 120 hp engines. 1931

R-31 Single engine Rolls-Royce Kestrel II powered parasol reconnaissance monoplane. Thirty-two were built for the Belgian Air Force, the survivors of which remained in service with the Luftwaffe after the invasion of Belgium in 1940. Spatted fixed main-wheels. One fitted with a Lorraine Petrel engine as R-32. 1935
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,18619.msg179255.html#msg179255

R-32 A direct development of the R.31 version with a Lorraine Petrel engine. A second aircraft was produced with an enclosed canopy and a Gnome-Rhone Mistral Major radial engine. Subsequently re-engined with a Hispano-Suiza 12Y engine. However, the R-32 did not show a sufficiently improved performance to gain a production order from the Belgian government.  Another report states that the tenth production R-31 actually did fly with a Gnome-Rhône 14Krsd in 1935 but was redesignated Renard R-32. That aircraft (which had other difference from the R-31 such as extended canopy glazing, a larger, curved tailfin, and spats) was then re-engined with a an Hispano-Suiza 12Y. Apparently, the sole R-32 then reverted to standard R-31 configuration powered by a Rolls-Royce Kestrel II.S. 1936

R-33 Braced high-wing touring monoplane with two seats. Effectively a parasol design with an elliptical fuselage and a 120 hp Renard engine. Two examples of this type completed as OO-ANT and OO-ANV. 1934

R-34 Aerobatic biplane which first flew on 3 July 1935 (OO-ANJ). Fully cowled engine, all-metal two-seat aeroplane with a forward stagger. 1933

R-35 Three-engine 18 seat passenger airliner. First flew on  1 April 1933 with a Gnome-Rhone K14 9-cylinder engine, but crashed. Wings were of all-metal construction. It was the first pressurised airliner to be designed and it was produced to meet a SABENA requirement to replace the Savoia-Marchetti S.73 on the Belgian Congo route.  The crash meant that the pressure cabin was never operationally evaluated. 1938
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12708.msg126019.html#msg126019

R-36 Single-seat fighter powered by a 910 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Ycrs engine. One example of this cantilever monoplane built as OO-ARW. Rebuilt as a new version. Was to be armed with a cannon armament. 1939

R-37 Low-wing monoplane fighter. Former R.36 evaluation airframe. This aircraft was siezed by the Germans in May 1940. fitted with a 1,100 hp Gnome-Rhone 14N-21 radial. OO-ATJ featured a large sreamlined spinner disc. 1939
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4676.msg36997.html#msg36997

R-37B Low-wing monoplane fighter. . A separate project saw the design for the R.37B 14N two-seat attack variant. 1939
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4676.msg36997.html#msg36997

R-38 Another development from the R.36 design , completed with 1,030 hp Rolls-Royce Merlin II. First flown 4 August 1939. the aircraft had a top speed of 326 mph. Evacuated to France 1940 but captured by the Luftwaffe. Returned to Belgium in 1946. 1938
 
R-39 Twin engined trainer aircraft project corresponding to a 1938 request from the Belgian Military Aviation. Also noted as a twinfuselage development of the R-36, a study which was not persued. 1939

R-40 Single engine low-wing presured monoplane fighter. The Renard R.40 high altitude fighter was constructed in prototype form and it was destroyed near Tournai in Belgium in 1940 while on the ground. Similar to the R-38 with a  Rolls-Royce Merlin engine though the design of the cockpit was different with its canopy faired into the rear fuselage ala Hawker Hurricane. 
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4676.msg63441.html#msg63441
and http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3572.msg115287.html#msg115287

R-42 Twin fuselage and twin engine fighter 
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4676.msg63441.html#msg63441

R-44 Two Continental 4 cylinder pusher utility aircraft with a high wing and tricycle undecarriage. 

R-45 Also referred to as the SR.45. A transport aircraft design with twin fuselages and two Pratt & Whitney 2SD 13G engines. Tricycle landing gear and rear clam-shelll type fuselage doors.Low-mid-wing twin engined cargo aircraft project. 
see http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,18619.msg179461.html#msg179461

Offline Cy-27

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Stampe et Renard (SNCAN)
 
SV-4B Biplane  trainer built by Renard pre and post-war. Mainly for the Belgian military, over 60 produced between 1948 and 1955. Gipsy or Cirrus Major engines.
 
SV-4C Biplane trainer support and maintainance. 

SV-4D Biplane trainer fitted with a Continental 165 hp engine. 1965

SV-4P Biplane development with a Potez 4D 31 200 hp engine. Project only 1957
Stampe et Renard SR-5 Unknown project 1948

Stampe et Renard
 
SR-6 Single engined biplane. See OO-SRX powered by a 185 hp Mathis G.7R engine. Having received the civilian registration OO-SRX the aircraft briefly wore Belgian Air Force roundels . 1949

SR-7 The Stampe & Renard SR-7 was a Belgian single-engine two-seater military training aircraft. It was made from an existing Stampe SV-4B aircraft. The first flight was made ​​on 11 July 1952. There were eventually ​​two more prototypes, the potential customer, the Belgian Air Force ended up buying Italian SiAl Marchetti SF.260 trainers. Built in Belgium and erected in France as the Farman 500 Monitor I. 1951

SR-7B  see OO-SRZ, which in 1956 was successful with L. Biancotto (British Lockheed Aerobatic Trophy, Coventry, July) who flew the prototype Stampe et Renard S.R.7B Monitor 4-01 tandem-seater. Also referred to as the Farman Monitor IV F-521.01 1954

SR-8 Farman Built in Belgium and assembled in France as the  Monitor II   F-510 1955

SR-9 Tricycle undercarriage variant of the SR-7B. Project with a 210 hp Continentasl engine.
 
SR-10 Version of SR-7B with a single seat and 210 hp Continental engine. Project only.
 
SR-11 Development project of the SR-6 biplane with a single-seat. 

SR-12 Project study for a version of the SR-9 with retractable undercarriage. Reached as far as the wind tunnel stage of testing t Rhode-St-Genese. 

SR-45 See Renard Constructions Aéronautiques R-45 design 
 
SOURCES:

Renard R-36/37/38 & 40 (Nicolas Godfurnon)

War Plane of the Second World War: Bombers and Reconnaissance Aircraft, Vol 7 (William Green)

Les Avions Renard 1922-1970 (A.Hauet & Guy Roberty)

Various Avions Magazine articles.

Offline c460

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Thank you Cy-27 for these posts.

Stampe et Renard SR-5 Unknown project 1948
Maybe there was no SR.5. In Les avions Stampe, Réginald Jouhaud says that the SR.6 was named that way because it came after the SV.5. The latter aircraft, SV.5 Tornado, designed in 1933, was the last successful design in the SV sequence, discounting the failed SV.10 bomber prototype. In between there were SV.6 to SV.9 projects developed from the SV.5 with different engines or propellers, but those were forgotten when came the SR.6.

Offline Skyblazer

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Great work as usual, Cy-27! As I'm not familiar with Belgian aviation, I need some explanation though: why "Stampe et Renard" above the "S.V."? Wasn't it "Stampe & Verdongen"? What was Renard's implication at that stage?

Offline Cy-27

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Stargazer2006 - You are right, "Stampe et Vertongen" was the original design ....
 
This from Les Avions Renard 1922-1970 (A.Hauet & Guy Roberty)
 
"After the war Renard recuperated his factory but had no current design to build. Jean Stampe had the SV 4B but his Deurne establishment had been flattened at the end of the war. It was logical for the two to join forces and create a <<Stampe & Renard>> company which from the Renard factory in Brussels built 65 SV 4B for the Belgian Air Force. They also gave design back-up for the 856 SV 4C that were built in France."

Offline hesham

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You are my hero Cy-27,


thank you very much.

Offline c460

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Hi,
This is a list of Renard technical files, published in Brussels Air Museum Magazine no.65 (1990), with no further comments.
Alfred Renard donated his archives to the Brussels Museum, and the list is probably a reproduction from some original document.

File numbers generally correspond to the R designations, and this document explains the gaps before R-16 and between R-17 and R-30.

However there are some differences:
- file no.39 is a helicopter project,
- file no.41 is the two-fuselage fighter called R-42 elsewhere (including the original drawing reproduced in the book by André Hauet)
- file no.42 is a study for a rail company,
- file no.44 is for windtunnel equipment, with no trace of the R-44 project.

Adrien

Offline hesham

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Amazing find my dear Adrien,


you made my day.

Offline hesham

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My dear Adrien,

there was something strange in your list,the Renard R-5 was airplane designed for ACAZ (Zeebrugge)
in 1920,and this company formed in 1920,but first known product was T.1 of 1924 ,so what was
this,a Project ?.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 05:44:34 am by hesham »

Offline c460

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Hi Hesham,
I have absolutely no idea, I don't know anything about this Renard R.5 outside this list.

Offline Arjen

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Alfred Renard designed one aircraft for ACAZ, in collaboration with Emile Allard: the ACAZ  T.2, which might have also have been referred to as T.1. Two were built. Number one had its first flight on the 4th of June 1924, at Ostend. On the 21st of June Lieutenant Hage took off from Ostend to participate in a 'Concours des avions de tourisme' in Brussels, but hit a tree in bad weather near Wemmel. No casualties, but the aircraft was destroyed. A second T.2 was constructed at ACAZ by the freshly hired engineer Fred Herrman - first flown mid July. Wiki states the first aircraft was in fact named T.1. In 'Les Avions Renard' by André Hauet and Guy Roberti both aircraft are identified as T.2.

According to Hauet and Roberti, ACAZ was founded in 1923, with the express purpose of building  aircraft to Renard and Allard's design.
As c460 wrote in reply #9:
Quote
File numbers generally correspond to the R designations, and this document explains the gaps before R-16 and between R-17 and R-30.
No exact match to the R designations, then.
I think file number 5 simply refers to the ACAZ T.2 - which, to my knowledge, was never referred to as R.5.

Offline hesham

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Thank you my dear Aejen,

but the company found in 1920 as Zeebrugge Aeronautical Construction Co. (Zacco),renamed
Ateliers de Construction Aeronautique de Zeebrugge (ACAZ) in 1925,and it's a mistake the year
1923.