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Author Topic: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...  (Read 35544 times)

Offline hesham

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Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #91 on: June 19, 2017, 08:39:10 am »
Hi Hesham  :D
This is the Model C Speedbird (N38C or NX38C) by Merle Larson of Oakland, Ca. The tiny wing (wingspan 12ft) was designed to work within the slipstream of the propeller and featured very large flaps for lift.
AFAIK the aircraft really flew, but on that first flight  on 7 December 1953 the engine stopped and the aircraft stalled which seems no surprise with such a small wing.  Luckily Mr. Larson thankfully escaped serious injury and later designed the (Larson-Holmes) D-1 Duster.
The Speedbird aircraft was modified from a Taylorcraft BC-12.
 
 

Offline Motocar

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #92 on: June 19, 2017, 08:41:55 am »
Biggest set of interesting projects and their short stories ...!

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #93 on: June 19, 2017, 08:59:24 am »
Thank you my dear Walter.

Offline snark

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #94 on: June 19, 2017, 05:57:32 pm »
Gazda Helicospeeder

The Gazda Model 100 Helicospeeder was an all-aluminum single-seat helicopter developed by Antoine Gazda of Wakefield, Rhode Island in 1947. It was powered by a Continental A-75 engine. One example was completed and test-flown, achieving a speed of 100 mph.

Apparently, the helicospeeder is now preserved at the Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos, CA
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 11:41:18 am by snark »

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #95 on: June 20, 2017, 06:09:31 am »
Thank you Snark,

and here is all Info about Gazda and his Projects;

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19852.msg192430.html#msg192430

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #96 on: June 20, 2017, 03:11:38 pm »
Here is the Option Air Acapella 100L [N360 CB]. It crashed on July 28, 1982.

Going back to the first type that Skyblazer posted back on this thread, in the dim and distant past, members may be aware that a second example was built of the Acapella, and this airframe is now on display at the EAA Museum at Oshkosh, and the full details can be seen on the 1000 photos site; http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/VanTilborg/10103.htm

Offline riggerrob

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #97 on: June 21, 2017, 08:38:50 pm »
Svardala Bullet was a 2-seater flying boat similar to Volmer Jensen's Sportsman.
Designer/builder John Svardala immigrated to Canada after World War 2. He settled in Wellandport, Ontario and flew for fun. In 1946, Svardala imported an X-1 airplane. I have no additional design details, but it flew at Hawkesbury, Ontario during the 1979s.
Before September 1964, Svardala built the prototype Svardala Bullet, 2-seater, side-by-side, flying-boat. The (plywood) hull, landing gear, (fabric-covered) wings, (fabric-covered) empennage and tip floats were similar to contemporary Volmer Sportsman and Anderson Kingfisher. The greatest difference was in in the aft cabin, which vaguely resembled a Republic Seabee. The most striking different was the short pylon supporting the engine (Continental or Lycoming) and propeller. Because the crankshaft was only a short distance above the (flat) aft fuselage, Svardala installed a 2-bladed, wooden propeller with broad, curved blades.
The Svardala Bullet was sold during the early 1970s and moved to Sherbrooke, Quebec. The new owner complained about poor climb performance. He installed a blown Plexiglas windshield, taller engine pylon and larger diameter propeller. I never saw the Bullet fly from Sherbrooke Airport. I have one photo of the yellow Svardala Bullet prototype.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #98 on: June 22, 2017, 12:03:45 am »
Hi riggertob :D
This is the only picture I ever saw of the Bullet. Any chance of you posting the yellow prototype?
Funny that apparently several registrations (most non-official) were tied to the Bullet. Can anyone confirm which was the correct registration (choose from: CF-PUY, CF-SYF, CF-PUH, CF-PHU, the latter possibly being the X-1 mentioned). 

Offline riggerrob

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #99 on: June 22, 2017, 11:06:42 am »
My photo is from the same angle as yours, but shows the higher engine pylon.

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #100 on: June 25, 2017, 09:18:53 am »
Hopefully my search criteria was correct and this is a new addition to the list of one-off US types. The Ryson ST-100 Cloudster was an attempt, in the 1970s, to slow down the import of European-manufactured powered sailplanes into the US at a time where soaring was beginning to gain popularity. The ST-100 was as the result of the collaboration of T Claude Ryan and his son (hence the Ryson) and differed from its European counterparts in the use of an all metal construction, unlike the European designs of powered sailplanes from Fournier etc, which used mainly a combination of wood, metal and fabric covered structures. Attached picture comes from the San Diego Museum archive, whilst the GA drawing is from Air International June 1977 edition.

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #101 on: June 25, 2017, 11:57:47 am »
Not sure if this goes under this subject matter, so apologies and Forum organisers please feel free to move it. Anyway, was looking through the January 1977 issue of Air International and came across a project which was being planned by Bill Lear. It was known as the Allegro and was a 10-seat business aircraft, the specifications can be seen in the attached clipping.

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #102 on: July 27, 2017, 11:00:21 am »
From JAWA 1963,Mr. Lawhorn and his Project LA-3.

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #103 on: July 28, 2017, 05:13:49 am »
From JAWA 1973,the VertaK S-220.