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Author Topic: THAAD Development  (Read 27533 times)

Offline sferrin

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #120 on: November 15, 2016, 12:30:23 pm »
At a distance it would be very difficult.  Close in though (which it has to do if it's going to hit it's target), something like HiBex wouldn't even notice the difference.

In that case, does a THAAD-ER even make sense? I started thinking that an intercept strategy could involve firing multiple missiles to different kill boxes to cover the cross range area, but that adds up fast.

It might be the case that gliders are best defeated by point defense alone, along the lines of HiBex.

THAAD-ER makes sense because it would still be more effective against anything short of a hypersonic boost glider, and you don't want to rely solely on HiBex type weapons as you only get one shot.  And I may be over estimating the difficulty of hitting a boost glider. 
"DARPA Hard"  It ain't what it use to be.

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #121 on: November 15, 2016, 12:35:18 pm »
At a distance it would be very difficult.  Close in though (which it has to do if it's going to hit it's target), something like HiBex wouldn't even notice the difference.

In that case, does a THAAD-ER even make sense? I started thinking that an intercept strategy could involve firing multiple missiles to different kill boxes to cover the cross range area, but that adds up fast.

It might be the case that gliders are best defeated by point defense alone, along the lines of HiBex.

Think of THAAD ER as something that can attack at higher altitudes, farther away from the launch point. This not only aids in the shoot-look-shoot doctrine giving you the possibility to go after a threat earlier but it also gives you the ability to protect a larger area. The same capability also makes it better than the baseline when confronting gliders.
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Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #122 on: November 26, 2016, 07:36:51 pm »
Interesting talk given that a large portion of THAAD supply is going to be headed to the region

Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #123 on: November 28, 2016, 12:02:14 pm »
Japan Gets Serious About THAAD

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On Thursday, Japan’s Yomiuri Shimbun reported that Tokyo would seriously consider purchasing the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile defense system from the United States.

The Yomiuri noted that a “committee in charge will be set up at the Defense Ministry to start full-scale discussion of the issue, while Defense Minister Tomomi Inada is making arrangements to visit Guam on Dec. 11-12 to inspect the state-of-the-art missile defense system at a U.S. base.”

Earlier this year, the United States and South Korea jointly agreed to deploy THAAD in South Korea to counter ballistic missile threats from North Korea.

Asked by reporters about the possibility of a THAAD working group at the Defense Ministry, Inada said “We are investigating future systems for intercepting missiles.” She added that her ministry was “considering what can be done.”

Before her comments to reporters on Friday, Inada had addressed Japan’s interest in THAAD on Monday.

“In light of the current situation surrounding Japan, I believe it is important to ensure missile defense,” Inada remarked earlier this week, at a Japanese Defense Ministry press conference. Inada was asked about her plans to visit Guam to inspect U.S. ground-based THAAD interceptors.

She added that there was “no specific plan for a visit to Guam,” but that Japan was “conducting surveys and research on a future ballistic missile defense system, but at the moment, there is no specific plan for introducing new equipment such as the THAAD missile.”

“We will conduct further surveys and research and actively consider how to enhance Japan’s ballistic missile defense capability,” Inada concluded.

To date this year, North Korea has carried out over 18 separate ballistic missile tests in addition to two nuclear device tests. One North Korean ballistic missile test earlier this year resulted in debris splashing down within Japan’s exclusive economic zone, drawing sharp protest from Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

That Tokyo would be interested in THAAD is not surprising. Tokyo already deploys considerably advanced missile defense capabilities, employing both Aegis-equipped, ship-based Standard Missile-3 and Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) interceptors.

Given the ongoing political scandal shaking South Korean President Park Geun-hye’s government in South Korea and the possibility that she may resign, potentially leading to an opposition party taking hold of the government in Seoul, South Korea’s THAAD deployment plans could be delayed or scuttled entirely.

In such a circumstance, Japan may be able to procure the battery intended for deployment in South Korea from the United States, at a potentially more favorable price point.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #124 on: December 12, 2016, 04:59:46 am »
To the Stars

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #125 on: December 15, 2016, 10:04:58 am »
Conference bill: MDA to establish POR for countering hypersonics

Lawmakers are calling for the Missile Defense Agency to develop a program of record by the end of September 2017 for a capability that can counter non-nuclear weapons that can fly more than five times the speed of sound.

The fiscal year 2017 defense authorization conference bill states that the director of the MDA will "serve as the executive agent for the Department of Defense for the development of a capability to counter hypersonic boost-glide vehicle capabilities and conventional prompt global strike capabilities that may be employed against the U.S., its allies and U.S deployed forces," according to language in the joint explanatory statement.

This provision stems from language in the House version of the defense policy bill, and follows both China and Russia successfully testing hypersonic capabilities earlier this year.

The House also called for withholding $25 million from the headquarters expenditures for both the Pentagon's policy and acquisition shops until the MDA certified the establishment of the program of record. This limitation of funding, as well as language calling for a report on the implications of the Missile Technology Control Regime on such defensive systems, were not included in the final version of the conference report.

The conference bill calls for the MDA director to develop "architectures for hypersonic defense capability from detecting threats to intercepting such threats, that (A) involves systems of the military departments and the defense agencies; and (B ) includes both kinetic and nonkinetic options for such interception."

In addition, the MDA director should submit a report by March that details the architectures and sensors that are being evaluated, according to the bill. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is also instructed to submit a report by March on the military capabilities and gaps related to this threat.

In a separate provision, lawmakers called for the defense secretary to make a decision regarding milestone A approval for the conventional prompt global strike program. This decision should occur by September 2020 or "the date that is 240 days after the date of the successful completion of intermediate range flight 2 of such system," according to the conference bill.

Hypersonic weapons are intended to provide a long-range, rapid, precise capability for destroying high-risk targets that appear only briefly or are heavily guarded. Such weapons would evade enemy defenses in anti-access and area-denial threat environments.

Lawmakers are also withholding 25 percent of the research and development funds for the CPGS system until the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff submits a report on "whether there are warfighter requirements or integrated priorities list submitted needs for a limited operational conventional prompt strike capability" and if the program plan and schedule submitted supports these, according to the bill.

Earlier this month, the House and Senate both passed the bill, which awaits President Obama's signature.
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Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #126 on: January 05, 2017, 05:39:18 am »
To the Stars

Offline NeilChapman

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #127 on: January 09, 2017, 07:31:39 pm »
China turns screw on corporate South Korea over US missile shield (ft.com, registration may be required)

Typical PRC response.  Although usually there are more histrionics.




Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #128 on: January 31, 2017, 03:15:16 am »
UAE THAAD Site Reaches Milestone

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The UAE operationally deployed the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system for the first time in 2016, a review of imagery suggests. The U.S.-built system was co-located at a recently constructed Patriot site, positioned immediately to the south of the UAE Naval College.

The THAAD site, constructed in 2014-2015, features four hardened munitions shelters, a support area and six prepared firing positions. All launch positions have been occupied with the unit’s transporter erector launchers (or TELs) since early 2016. In the most recent imagery in Google Earth, several additional TELs have been noted in the support area.

The THAAD system—designed to intercept short-range, medium-range, and some intermediate-range ballistic missiles—works in concert with the country’s existing assets including the Patriot PAC-3s, Hawk batteries and other associated radar elements. Together, they form a multilayered missile defense network protecting population centers and critical infrastructure.

In 2011, the UAE became the first international customer to procure the advanced missile defense system as a Foreign Military Sale under the Arms Export Control Act. According to the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency, the initial contract, estimated $1.135 billion, included 48 missiles, 9 TELs and two Radars.

Initial deliveries were made to the Middle Eastern country in late 2015. Around the same time, 81 Emirati air defenders graduated from the first foreign THAAD Operator/Maintainer course at Fort Bliss; a 2nd class graduated in May 2016.he same year in October, the system reached a milestone when it was observed with the X-band AN/TPY-2 fire control radar. Prior to the radar’s employment, the system was likely operational, as it’s capable of utilizing fire control cues from other deployed sensors, including those potentially linked by allies protecting the region. (Previous imagery, for example, shows various TELs on alert, with missile canisters elevated in the launch position.)

When not deployed as a fire control radar, the AN/TPY-2 can operate in “Forward Based Mode” relaying tracking and IFF data to remote missile defense systems.  However, switching between the two modes can take up to 8 hours. (A discussion of the radar’s ranges in both modes as publicly reported, can be found here.)

In total, a THAAD battery consists of six truck-mounted M1075 launchers, 48 interceptors (8 per launcher), a THAAD Fire Control and Communications (TFCC) unit aka Tactical Station Group (TSG), and one AN/TPY-2 radar. The truck platform used for THAAD is the Oshkosh M1120 HEMTT LHS.

Outside of the UAE, the U.S. Army has deployed a battery to the U.S. territory of Guam and has plans to setup a THAAD site in South Korea. A Qatari order was also in the works but has since been delayed due to the country’s declining hydrocarbon revenue.
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown

Offline fredymac

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #129 on: February 01, 2017, 03:21:28 pm »
THAAD-ER video.  No telling how long this one will last if there is a copyright.


Offline bobbymike

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Offline bobbymike

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"The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection." - Thomas Paine

"On what principle is it that with nothing but improvement behind us, we are to expect nothing but deterioration before us?" - Lord Macaulay

Offline bring_it_on

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Re: THAAD Development
« Reply #132 on: March 20, 2017, 03:17:48 pm »
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« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 03:25:50 pm by bring_it_on »
Old radar types never die; they just phased array - Unknown