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Author Topic: SpaceX Heavy  (Read 20266 times)

Offline TomS

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #75 on: June 28, 2017, 03:18:06 am »
That's what I get for posting late at night.

Per Space Intel Report, STP-2 is now the second 2018 flight, which will actually be the third Falcon Heavy mission.  I'd missed a couple of the payloads and thought it was just the COSMIC cluster and some nanosats, which could have been a ride-along on another launch.  It's actually got a bunch more going on.

Edit: So here is the actual mission description: https://www.fbo.gov/utils/view?id=36de6af7670d2636c8c195173dd500e1 

Very complex, it calls for deploying the six COSMIC-2 sats in a low circular orbit inclined at 24 degrees, along with a bunch of smaller satellites (up to six auxiliary payloads and a bunch of cubesats).  Then the second stage burns again to put DSX in a highly elliptical MEO orbit with a 45-degree inclination (a major plane change from the initial orbit).  That's a LOT of delta-v.  Then it burns again for five seconds, just because. The second stage will get a serious workout on this flight.

And it does this carrying five tonnes of ballast in addition to all the payloads.   If it was just a matter of launching the payloads, I think they could have flown it on a Falcon 9.  But this is designed as a stressor mission to test the full capacity of FH, so it carries ballast.  My understanding is that, assuming the first two FH flights go as planned, this should be the last of three flights needed to certify FH for national security missions?

« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 07:46:29 am by TomS »

Offline Byeman

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #76 on: June 28, 2017, 09:18:51 am »
My understanding is that, assuming the first two FH flights go as planned, this should be the last of three flights needed to certify FH for national security missions?

They have to do more than just certification.  They need a west coast capability, a longer fairing and vertical payload integration

Offline Michel Van

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #77 on: June 28, 2017, 11:41:02 am »
My understanding is that, assuming the first two FH flights go as planned, this should be the last of three flights needed to certify FH for national security missions?

They have to do more than just certification.  They need a west coast capability, a longer fairing and vertical payload integration

According Falcon 9 Launch manifesto on Wikipedia.
1. Demo-flight in September - October 2017
2. Arabsat 6A in 2018
3. USAF STP-2 in 2018
4. Private circumlunar trip with 2 person in Dragon2 on end of 2018.

Makes four flight, enough for NRO qualification for a Key Hole Satellite launch by Falcon Heavy from 2019 on.
source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Falcon_9_and_Falcon_Heavy_launches#2017_2
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Offline bobbymike

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"The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection." - Thomas Paine

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Offline Byeman

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Re: SpaceX Heavy
« Reply #79 on: July 07, 2017, 06:45:14 am »

Makes four flight, enough for NRO qualification for a Key Hole Satellite launch by Falcon Heavy from 2019 on.
source


They are all booked on Delta IV Heavy until 2023.

Offline bobbymike

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"The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection." - Thomas Paine

"On what principle is it that with nothing but improvement behind us, we are to expect nothing but deterioration before us?" - Lord Macaulay

Online Grey Havoc

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