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Author Topic: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs  (Read 11806 times)

Offline malipa

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2014, 02:52:19 am »
Is the F-15 a better fighter than the F-16? And why?

Offline GTX

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2014, 02:59:28 am »

I'm aware of the 2018 start, but is the 2022 from data? I can understand if they just have to share airframes between more pilots a little more, but I could've sworn I'd read a mid-2020 end of service life for the Hornets.



I assure you that my information is correct.  It comes directly from those RAAF personnel responsible for the decisions.  This has been carefully looked at and considered for a number of years now.  To try to keep the classics in service any longer (even for an extra 6mths) will be prohibitively expensive.

Offline TomS

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 06:20:34 am »
Is the ALG-218(v)2 on the growler a Radar Warning Receiver or does it belong to a separate category?

It's ALQ-218, and it is much more capable than a warning receiver -- it's a full-fledged electronic intelligence collection tool.

Offline phrenzy

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2014, 03:33:08 pm »
[quote autaor=malipa link=topic=20938.msg225705#msg225705 date=1404294739]
Is the F-15 a better fighter than the F-16? And why?
[/quote]

They both have some excellent qualities but have different capabilities, in the context Of the f/a-18 acquisition the f-15's much longer range and heavier load carrying capabilities made it a more potent weapon.  For the narrower individual dog fighting air superiority role the f-16 is excellent, it's price which allows you to buy them at a rate of 2 to 1 against Eagles. For a large airforce like the USAF this means big numbers and the ability to use f-16 for what it's good at and free up f-15 for more complex duties. For a small airforce like the RAAF though where they would likely have less than 100 fighters, regardless of type, having 60 f-15s would result in significant difference in capabilities compared to 90 f-16s. It would certainly represent a very different posture (and VERY different percieved posture) from countries in the SEA region.

In a very basic and not wholly accurate way the f-16 is more defensive and the f-15 more offensive. 
We train young men to drop fire on people, yet their commanders won't allow them to write "fuck" on their airplanes because it's obscene.  -  Kurtz

Offline Mr London 24/7

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2015, 03:10:08 pm »

Offline Mr London 24/7

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2015, 06:47:29 am »

Wiechman (see quoted avweek article) now freelancing?:

http://www.eagleaerie.com/news-press-releases/

Yes: http://www.aere.iastate.edu/department-overview/advisory-council/
Quote
Alan Wiechman recently retired as Vice President Special Technology Integration Phantom Works, Boeing Defense Space & Security.  From 2006 through 2009 Alan was on Special Assignment

Offline Triton

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #36 on: September 06, 2015, 08:28:38 pm »
"Cyber missions could fuel Boeing EA-18G orders: U.S. Navy chief"
WASHINGTON | By Andrea Shalal

September 3, 2015

Source:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/03/us-usa-navy-boeing-idUSKCN0R32I320150903

Quote
The Pentagon is evaluating whether potential cyber missions could drive demand for additional Boeing Co (BA.N) EA-18G electronic attack jets, or Growlers, the top U.S. Navy officer told Reuters on Thursday.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert said any decisions about additional orders of Growlers should be included in the Pentagon's budget request for fiscal 2017, since Boeing will shut the production line after all orders have been fulfilled.

Greenert said it was imperative to map out any additional orders now, given the high cost of restarting production once the line closed.
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"This is kind of a no-fail deal," he said in an interview. Boeing was pursuing several other foreign orders, but he did not believe they were large enough to sustain production of the jets.

Boeing's combined St. Louis production line for F/A-18E/F fighter jets and the EA-18G Growlers was slated to shut in 2017, until Congress added funding for 12 more F/A-18E/F Super Hornets to the fiscal 2016 budget plan, and Boeing signed a deal to sell 28 of the jets to Kuwait.

If those orders are confirmed, the line should remain open well into 2019, Boeing has said.

Greenert, who will retire and be replaced by Admiral John Richardson on Sept. 18, said the Navy still believed its planned purchase of 153 Growlers was sufficient, but more work was underway to assess the needs of other military services, as well as the possible use for cyber missions.

He said the Navy had asked the Pentagon's Cost Analysis and Program Evaluation (CAPE) office to evaluate the electronic warfare needs of the U.S. Air Force and Marine Corps.

Navy officials had estimated that the two services might need about 30 more Growlers to meet their needs, according to sources familiar with the study, although both services had told Navy officials they planned to satisfy their requirements using the Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) F-35 fighter jet. The sources requested anonymity because the study was incomplete.

Greenert said a department-wide review of electronic warfare needs had also revealed a possible need to outfit Growlers or other aircraft with special cyber "pods" or "nodes" that could be used for jamming or infiltrating enemy computer networks, and removing information.

That issue was still being evaluated by the military services, and would also include U.S. Cyber Command and the staff of the Joint Chiefs, he said, adding that he expected the fiscal 2017 budget proposal to provide clear answers about the number of jets needed.

Greenert said the Navy was watching for possible shortfalls of F/A-18E/F fighter jets on its aircraft carriers, given delays in the F-35 program and lengthy repair times for existing jets.

He said the Navy had made progress in speeding up repairs of older jets, which could limit the need for more Super Hornets. "I think we'll manage our way through that," Greenert said.

Boeing had no immediate comment.

Greenert said the Navy remained focused on improving cybersecurity after a major breach of the unclassified Navy-Marine Corp network last year, and would dedicate "hundreds of millions of dollars" to the effort, beginning in October.

(Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Richard Chang)

Offline Grey Havoc

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Offline Triton

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Re: Boeing Bullish Over F-18 and Future Programs
« Reply #38 on: March 02, 2017, 01:02:13 pm »
"US Navy Orders Five F/A-18E Super Hornets & Seven EA-18G Growlers From Boeing"
Published: Thursday, 02 March 2017 11:11

Quote
The U.S. Navy ordered seven Lot 40 EA-18G Growlers and five F/A-18E Super Hornet fighters from Boeing in a $678.6 million contract. The deal also includes associated airborne electronic attack kits, likely the Next Generation Jammer (NGJ). Raytheon's NGJ solution was selected by the U.S. Navy in 2013 to replace the legacy ALQ-99 systems used on the EA-18G airborne electronic attack aircraft.

Source:
http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/defence-news/2017/march-2017-navy-naval-forces-defense-industry-technology-maritime-security-global-news/4939-us-navy-orders-five-f-a-18e-super-hornets-seven-ea-18g-growlers-from-boeing.html