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Author Topic: Hiller's Propelloplanes  (Read 7485 times)

Offline Jemiba

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Hiller's Propelloplanes
« on: February 24, 2008, 11:39:04 am »
8 prop tandem tilt wing, weight given as  60.000 lb in The Aeroplane 2/1959 :
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 04:39:42 pm by Stargazer2006 »
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Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 04:22:48 pm »
Although the X-18 is generally associated with the name "Propelloplane", this term was in fact coined by Hiller to designate a whole series of earlier designs using tilt-wings in the same way as the X-18.

The AIAA's website provides a very good starting place to these fascinating designs, whose sole misfortune was to be unproven compared to the then-in-use aircraft and helicopter configurations. The texts below were taken for the most part from that excellent website.

  • First known Propelloplane was the Model 1035. This design was the first tilt-wing under an Army contract. Wing tips were fixed due to initial concern about tilted sections not bathed in propeller downwash. Studies on this design began in 1953.
  • Second known Propelloplane was the Model 1045. This design was proposed to the Army in 1954 against its requirement for a utility helicopter. It featured a bubble canopy which provided excellent visibility. As with the earlier Model 1035, only the parts of the wings extending on each side of the fuselage tilted, while the central part stayed in place. Although convinced a tilt-wing would fulfill the mission, a conventional helicopter was advanced as the primary offering (the Bell UH-1, aka "Huey").
  • Much bigger was the Model 1048/A Propelloplane. Hiller received the first government-funded tilt-wing study contract for that model, which turned company policy toward the transport size. The design used the existing Lockheed Hercules fuselage. The Office of Naval Research became fond of this 30-ton transport and encouraged more development.
  • The Model 1051 Propelloplane, which was another tilt-wing design, possibly the one that was submitted in a competition held by the Office of Naval Research and was defeated by Vertol's lower-cost aircraft.
  • The Model 1056, Model 1057 and Model 1058 designs, which were respectively a tiltrotor design, a tilt-wing design and a tilt-duct design in a Hiller study for the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics which compared several VTOL and STOL concepts. Ultimately, the tilt-wing concept was confirmed as the most advantageous to develop and build.
  • The Model 1085 Propelloplane, a proof-of-concept research prototype designated as the X-18 by the US Air Force which utilized a modified fuselage from a Chase XC-122C Avitruc model with other parts coming from a Convair R3Y Tradewind transport. The Allison T40 turboprops and the propellers were reused from the Navy's unfortunate Convair XFY-1 "Pogo" and Lockheed XFV-1 "Salmon" VTOL fighters.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 04:15:23 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline yasotay

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2010, 07:37:20 am »
Although the X-18 is generally associated with the name "Propelloplane", this term was in fact coined by Hiller to designate a whole series
  • Much bigger was the Model 1048 Propelloplane. Hiller received the first government-funded tilt-wing study contract for that model, which turned company policy toward the transport size. The off-the-shelf and ungainly airframe soon gave way to a plan to use the existing Lockheed Hercules fuselage, resulting in the revised Model 1048A. The Office of Naval Research became fond of this 30-ton transport and encouraged more development.

I have to giggle at the picture of the men standing right at the optimal point for the downwash from the props.  Given their size the outwash would make a V-22 environment seem like a summer breeze.  Still it would have been impressive to see these aircraft.

Offline Barrington Bond

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2010, 01:20:48 am »
From The Aeroplane 23 May 1958.

"It hasn't squeaked in a week!"

Offline lark

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2010, 01:04:53 pm »
In 'Air Force Magazine' - September  1959  the Model 1048 with raised cockpit
is labelled as the Model 1067 transport-rescue aircraft...

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 01:19:45 pm »
In 'Air Force Magazine' - September  1959  the Model 1048 with raised cockpit
is labelled as the Model 1067 transport-rescue aircraft...

Interesting. So if this was the 1067, what did the original (non-A) Model 1048 look like?
Anyway, I'll correct my post and repost the picture accordingly.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 01:22:27 pm »
The Hiller 1067, as described in lark's post above:

Offline Triton

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2010, 12:35:20 pm »
Profile drawing of Hiller Model 1057.

A tilt-wing design in a Hiller study for the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics which compared several VTOL and STOL concepts. Ultimately, the tilt-wing concept was confirmed as the most advantageous to develop and build.

Source:
http://www.aiaa.org/tc/vstol/unbuilt/
"Straight Up and Away" Flying Review. May 1969: 52
Straubel, John F. One Way Up. Hiller Aircraft Company, Inc., 1964.

« Last Edit: August 16, 2010, 12:55:50 pm by Triton »

Offline Triton

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2010, 12:55:10 pm »
Profile drawing of Hiller Model 1058 tilt duct.

A tilt-duct design in a Hiller study for the Navy Bureau of Aeronautics which compared several VTOL and STOL concepts. Ultimately, the tilt-wing concept was confirmed as the most advantageous to develop and build. In 1956, a tilt-wing (the 1058??) was submitted in a competition held by the Office of Naval Research. It was defeated by Vertol's lower-cost aircraft.

Source:
http://www.aiaa.org/tc/vstol/unbuilt/
"Straight Up and Away" Flying Review. May 1969: 52
Straubel, John F. One Way Up. Hiller Aircraft Company, Inc., 1964.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2011, 10:03:14 am »
The Model 1045:
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 04:39:19 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Boxman

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2012, 02:15:38 pm »
Recently posted by the San Diego Air & Space Museum (SDASM) archive page (SDASMARCHIVES) on YouTube, some Hiller X-18 (USAF Ser. No. 57-3078 / ex- 49-2883)  test flight footage.

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2013, 10:23:38 am »
To the Stars

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2013, 02:42:10 pm »
http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/103343.pdf

Excellent find! Too bad the scans are often very lousy, presumably made from lousy photocopies...

Offline hesham

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2013, 03:05:36 pm »

Offline AeroFranz

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Re: Hiller's Propelloplanes
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2013, 05:19:31 am »
FYI, There is a companion report on aerodynamic characteristics, available on dtic. It comes up if you search "Propelloplane"
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